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Posts Tagged ‘Xbox 360’

‘Doodle Jump For Kinect’ Review – High Jump Hijinks

July 1st, 2013 No comments

Doodle Jump For Kinect

For a game to make the jump from a portable device to home console there are many, many platforms to land on along the way. While porting over a game might be easy, retaining the essence of what makes it good is usually the hardest hurdle to clear. The latest game to try to make the massive leap from smartphones (Android, iOS, BlackBerry, etc) to a whole new world of consoles is the wildly successful "Doodle Jump." With fifteen million downloads across all of its previous platforms, it clearly has the high profile visibility that it needs to succeed in a new realm of competition, but can the simple and addictive gameplay of the original help it find success on the Xbox 360... as a Kinect game?

"Doodle Jump for Kinect" retains the same core gameplay that its small screen counterparts had, while adding in full-body motion controls to simulate the movements of the Doodler. The overall objective is still the same: safely get from the bottom of the level to the top as you guide the Doodler from the left to right as he jumps from platform to platform. As long as you avoid monsters, cannonballs, and breakaway rocks along the way, you'll do just fine. In the Kinect version, players guide the Doodler left and right by stepping left or right, using their body as a replacement for their finger. This release includes three all-new, original worlds, allowing fans of the original game to have an entirely unique experience.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Getting into "Doodle Jump" isn't that hard; all you need to do is step left or right to direct the Doodler as he ascends each level. While he reacts best to full body movements, the camera will pick up even the slightest leans, which allow players a higher level of precision - a necessity for picking up bonus coins and power-ups. In addition to jumping, players must also use their arms to shoot and initiate power-ups like wings (flapping your arms) and rocket boosters (arms above your head). As long as players don't get too much into the habit of leaning, "Doodle Jump" is a rare Kinect game that can actually be played in a relatively confined space, without a ton of physical activity. Even the more challenging boss battles, which require more focus and attention, can be overcome with the motion controls… and a bit of practice practice.

To say this version of "Doodle Jump" brings something new to the table would be a bit of an exaggeration. Outside of the controls and the platform, the fundamentals of the game are essentially the same as the portable versions, which means that if you've already burned out on the original, this one might not be for you. That being said, this release doesn't offer a ton of variety either. The three worlds offer some new visuals, and enemies, but the simplicity that makes the game great, is also what makes it redundant. The Doodler is always headed up, and all that really changes is the path that he takes.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Every iteration of "Doodle Jump" seems to serve as a weird metaphor for life, since the Doodler never really dies, he just gets set back a bit, and has to keep trying until he gets it right. The Kinect version retains these same sensibilities, and should appeal to anyone that has gotten addicted to "Doodle Jump" in the past, only this time, they have to get on their feet to play it.

There is a reason "Doodle Jump" has been downloaded over fifteen million times - it's simple, fun, and addictive, and most of that holds true for the Kinect version as well. Controlling the Doodler with your body keeps the player's activity to a minimum, which, when it comes to Kinect, less tends to be better. The game may be a bit on the short side, but it's priced right for its abbreviated experience, and you can always go back to try to earn three stars on every level (good luck with that). While an experience like this might be a bit easier with the precision of a game controller, "Doodle Jump" was never really intended to be a precise game. Finding simple and fun Kinect games isn't always easy, but "Doodle Jump" seems to find the sweet spot for both.

Score: 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Project X Zone' Review - Let Our Powers Combine
'Rogue Legacy' Review (PC) -- Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again...

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

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‘Doodle Jump For Kinect’ Review – High Jump Hijinks

July 1st, 2013 No comments

Doodle Jump For Kinect

For a game to make the jump from a portable device to home console there are many, many platforms to land on along the way. While porting over a game might be easy, retaining the essence of what makes it good is usually the hardest hurdle to clear. The latest game to try to make the massive leap from smartphones (Android, iOS, BlackBerry, etc) to a whole new world of consoles is the wildly successful "Doodle Jump." With fifteen million downloads across all of its previous platforms, it clearly has the high profile visibility that it needs to succeed in a new realm of competition, but can the simple and addictive gameplay of the original help it find success on the Xbox 360... as a Kinect game?

"Doodle Jump for Kinect" retains the same core gameplay that its small screen counterparts had, while adding in full-body motion controls to simulate the movements of the Doodler. The overall objective is still the same: safely get from the bottom of the level to the top as you guide the Doodler from the left to right as he jumps from platform to platform. As long as you avoid monsters, cannonballs, and breakaway rocks along the way, you'll do just fine. In the Kinect version, players guide the Doodler left and right by stepping left or right, using their body as a replacement for their finger. This release includes three all-new, original worlds, allowing fans of the original game to have an entirely unique experience.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Getting into "Doodle Jump" isn't that hard; all you need to do is step left or right to direct the Doodler as he ascends each level. While he reacts best to full body movements, the camera will pick up even the slightest leans, which allow players a higher level of precision - a necessity for picking up bonus coins and power-ups. In addition to jumping, players must also use their arms to shoot and initiate power-ups like wings (flapping your arms) and rocket boosters (arms above your head). As long as players don't get too much into the habit of leaning, "Doodle Jump" is a rare Kinect game that can actually be played in a relatively confined space, without a ton of physical activity. Even the more challenging boss battles, which require more focus and attention, can be overcome with the motion controls… and a bit of practice practice.

To say this version of "Doodle Jump" brings something new to the table would be a bit of an exaggeration. Outside of the controls and the platform, the fundamentals of the game are essentially the same as the portable versions, which means that if you've already burned out on the original, this one might not be for you. That being said, this release doesn't offer a ton of variety either. The three worlds offer some new visuals, and enemies, but the simplicity that makes the game great, is also what makes it redundant. The Doodler is always headed up, and all that really changes is the path that he takes.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Every iteration of "Doodle Jump" seems to serve as a weird metaphor for life, since the Doodler never really dies, he just gets set back a bit, and has to keep trying until he gets it right. The Kinect version retains these same sensibilities, and should appeal to anyone that has gotten addicted to "Doodle Jump" in the past, only this time, they have to get on their feet to play it.

There is a reason "Doodle Jump" has been downloaded over fifteen million times - it's simple, fun, and addictive, and most of that holds true for the Kinect version as well. Controlling the Doodler with your body keeps the player's activity to a minimum, which, when it comes to Kinect, less tends to be better. The game may be a bit on the short side, but it's priced right for its abbreviated experience, and you can always go back to try to earn three stars on every level (good luck with that). While an experience like this might be a bit easier with the precision of a game controller, "Doodle Jump" was never really intended to be a precise game. Finding simple and fun Kinect games isn't always easy, but "Doodle Jump" seems to find the sweet spot for both.

Score: 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Project X Zone' Review - Let Our Powers Combine
'Rogue Legacy' Review (PC) -- Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again...

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

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‘Doodle Jump For Kinect’ Review – High Jump Hijinks

July 1st, 2013 No comments

Doodle Jump For Kinect

For a game to make the jump from a portable device to home console there are many, many platforms to land on along the way. While porting over a game might be easy, retaining the essence of what makes it good is usually the hardest hurdle to clear. The latest game to try to make the massive leap from smartphones (Android, iOS, BlackBerry, etc) to a whole new world of consoles is the wildly successful "Doodle Jump." With fifteen million downloads across all of its previous platforms, it clearly has the high profile visibility that it needs to succeed in a new realm of competition, but can the simple and addictive gameplay of the original help it find success on the Xbox 360... as a Kinect game?

"Doodle Jump for Kinect" retains the same core gameplay that its small screen counterparts had, while adding in full-body motion controls to simulate the movements of the Doodler. The overall objective is still the same: safely get from the bottom of the level to the top as you guide the Doodler from the left to right as he jumps from platform to platform. As long as you avoid monsters, cannonballs, and breakaway rocks along the way, you'll do just fine. In the Kinect version, players guide the Doodler left and right by stepping left or right, using their body as a replacement for their finger. This release includes three all-new, original worlds, allowing fans of the original game to have an entirely unique experience.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Getting into "Doodle Jump" isn't that hard; all you need to do is step left or right to direct the Doodler as he ascends each level. While he reacts best to full body movements, the camera will pick up even the slightest leans, which allow players a higher level of precision - a necessity for picking up bonus coins and power-ups. In addition to jumping, players must also use their arms to shoot and initiate power-ups like wings (flapping your arms) and rocket boosters (arms above your head). As long as players don't get too much into the habit of leaning, "Doodle Jump" is a rare Kinect game that can actually be played in a relatively confined space, without a ton of physical activity. Even the more challenging boss battles, which require more focus and attention, can be overcome with the motion controls… and a bit of practice practice.

To say this version of "Doodle Jump" brings something new to the table would be a bit of an exaggeration. Outside of the controls and the platform, the fundamentals of the game are essentially the same as the portable versions, which means that if you've already burned out on the original, this one might not be for you. That being said, this release doesn't offer a ton of variety either. The three worlds offer some new visuals, and enemies, but the simplicity that makes the game great, is also what makes it redundant. The Doodler is always headed up, and all that really changes is the path that he takes.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Every iteration of "Doodle Jump" seems to serve as a weird metaphor for life, since the Doodler never really dies, he just gets set back a bit, and has to keep trying until he gets it right. The Kinect version retains these same sensibilities, and should appeal to anyone that has gotten addicted to "Doodle Jump" in the past, only this time, they have to get on their feet to play it.

There is a reason "Doodle Jump" has been downloaded over fifteen million times - it's simple, fun, and addictive, and most of that holds true for the Kinect version as well. Controlling the Doodler with your body keeps the player's activity to a minimum, which, when it comes to Kinect, less tends to be better. The game may be a bit on the short side, but it's priced right for its abbreviated experience, and you can always go back to try to earn three stars on every level (good luck with that). While an experience like this might be a bit easier with the precision of a game controller, "Doodle Jump" was never really intended to be a precise game. Finding simple and fun Kinect games isn't always easy, but "Doodle Jump" seems to find the sweet spot for both.

Score: 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Project X Zone' Review - Let Our Powers Combine
'Rogue Legacy' Review (PC) -- Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again...

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

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Handful of New ‘Killer is Dead’ Trailers Introduce Bosses and (Kinda Sexist) Mondo Girls

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

The last time I checked on "Killer is Dead," Grasshopper Manufacture's imminent future-noir curio, director Goichi Suda was ruminating on his appreciation of television and how it's influenced the structure and marketing of his game. Since then, though, publisher XSEED has released three new trailers that have somehow slipped between my cybernetic hyper-fingers.

"Killer is Dead" has garnered a fair amount of buzz on the strength of its visual style, Suda 51's institutional flair, and the fact that protagonist Mondo Zappa has a robot arm and gets to go to the Moon. The third trailer introduces some things I'm -- pardon the pun -- less jazzed about. Namely, the game's Mondo Girls, a group of women included in the game as an homage to 007's traditional Bond Girls.

Real talk: Bond's vaguely non-consensual sexual encounter with Sévérine (I had to look her name up) -- and her subsequent murder -- are the crudest, skeeziest, most retrograde, and most boring parts of Skyfall. That there are a set of Mondo Girls that exist in "Killer is Dead" solely to provide titillation is gross. That Mondo has a set of "Gigolo Glasses" that allow him to see through these women's clothes is creepy, voyeuristic, and predatory.

My understanding is that there "Scarlett Missions" that task Mondo with certain objectives -- killing enemies in a given amount of time, or using only a specific weapon. The reward, this trailer suggests, is sex.

There are two different, but related, ideas at play. The first is that sex is something that can be given or withheld as an incentive for men. The second is that women can be unlocked like puzzle boxes: perform the right actions in the right order and the right time, and the prize is yours. Both of these are incredibly demeaning, but they're on display, front-and-center, in the third trailer for "Killer is Dead" -- sex isn't a Rubik's Cube, y'all.

Here's Suda, speaking to Games Industry: "Sexuality is a touchy subject. We don't want to make people offended, but we're trying to create something that makes people laugh a bit because we're [dealing with] that topic."

Requisite benefit of the doubt paragraph: "Killer is Dead" isn't out yet, so it may yet be more nuanced and less objectifying than these trailers let on. Vivienne Squall, Mondo's in-game boss, also seems like a fun character -- she's sassy, smart, and can shoot 16 akimbo pistols at once, apparently. She was introduced in an earlier trailer.

Moving on! The fourth trailer for "Killer is Dead" disappointingly drops the episodic conceit of the earlier ones and opts for straight-up E3 bombast: campy, futuristic gore set to Chopin's Étude no. 3, in E major. (Fun fact: Grasshopper has previously used Dvořák’s New World Symphony and Wagner's Flight of the Valkyries for "Killer is Dead" trailers. It's becoming A Thing.)

The fifth, and most recent, trailer for the game introduces David, who's kind of rocking an Amon Ra-type headdress-slash-codpiece. What I like about both of these is how self-aware they are: Suda breaks the fourth wall and throws out spoilers with gleeful abandon (hint: everybody dies), confident in the fact that his aesthetic overwhelms and assimilates it all into one big gonzo amalgam.

Still, for all its style and eye-winking knowingness, "Killer is Dead" has been hampered -- as far as my internal hype-train goes -- by the presence of the Mondo Girls. As often as Suda sets his sights on pillorying pop culture, a bit of interrogation into women-as-sex-puzzle would be a nice surprise.

"Killer is Dead" is set for an August release for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3.

Related Posts
Suda 51's 'Black Knight Sword' Half Off This Week On XBLA
'Killer is Dead' Still To Be Published By XSEED

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

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Handful of New ‘Killer is Dead’ Trailers Introduce Bosses and (Kinda Sexist) Mondo Girls

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

The last time I checked on "Killer is Dead," Grasshopper Manufacture's imminent future-noir curio, director Goichi Suda was ruminating on his appreciation of television and how it's influenced the structure and marketing of his game. Since then, though, publisher XSEED has released three new trailers that have somehow slipped between my cybernetic hyper-fingers.

"Killer is Dead" has garnered a fair amount of buzz on the strength of its visual style, Suda 51's institutional flair, and the fact that protagonist Mondo Zappa has a robot arm and gets to go to the Moon. The third trailer introduces some things I'm -- pardon the pun -- less jazzed about. Namely, the game's Mondo Girls, a group of women included in the game as an homage to 007's traditional Bond Girls.

Real talk: Bond's vaguely non-consensual sexual encounter with Sévérine (I had to look her name up) -- and her subsequent murder -- are the crudest, skeeziest, most retrograde, and most boring parts of Skyfall. That there are a set of Mondo Girls that exist in "Killer is Dead" solely to provide titillation is gross. That Mondo has a set of "Gigolo Glasses" that allow him to see through these women's clothes is creepy, voyeuristic, and predatory.

My understanding is that there "Scarlett Missions" that task Mondo with certain objectives -- killing enemies in a given amount of time, or using only a specific weapon. The reward, this trailer suggests, is sex.

There are two different, but related, ideas at play. The first is that sex is something that can be given or withheld as an incentive for men. The second is that women can be unlocked like puzzle boxes: perform the right actions in the right order and the right time, and the prize is yours. Both of these are incredibly demeaning, but they're on display, front-and-center, in the third trailer for "Killer is Dead" -- sex isn't a Rubik's Cube, y'all.

Here's Suda, speaking to Games Industry: "Sexuality is a touchy subject. We don't want to make people offended, but we're trying to create something that makes people laugh a bit because we're [dealing with] that topic."

Requisite benefit of the doubt paragraph: "Killer is Dead" isn't out yet, so it may yet be more nuanced and less objectifying than these trailers let on. Vivienne Squall, Mondo's in-game boss, also seems like a fun character -- she's sassy, smart, and can shoot 16 akimbo pistols at once, apparently. She was introduced in an earlier trailer.

Moving on! The fourth trailer for "Killer is Dead" disappointingly drops the episodic conceit of the earlier ones and opts for straight-up E3 bombast: campy, futuristic gore set to Chopin's Étude no. 3, in E major. (Fun fact: Grasshopper has previously used Dvořák’s New World Symphony and Wagner's Flight of the Valkyries for "Killer is Dead" trailers. It's becoming A Thing.)

The fifth, and most recent, trailer for the game introduces David, who's kind of rocking an Amon Ra-type headdress-slash-codpiece. What I like about both of these is how self-aware they are: Suda breaks the fourth wall and throws out spoilers with gleeful abandon (hint: everybody dies), confident in the fact that his aesthetic overwhelms and assimilates it all into one big gonzo amalgam.

Still, for all its style and eye-winking knowingness, "Killer is Dead" has been hampered -- as far as my internal hype-train goes -- by the presence of the Mondo Girls. As often as Suda sets his sights on pillorying pop culture, a bit of interrogation into women-as-sex-puzzle would be a nice surprise.

"Killer is Dead" is set for an August release for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3.

Related Posts
Suda 51's 'Black Knight Sword' Half Off This Week On XBLA
'Killer is Dead' Still To Be Published By XSEED

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Microsoft No Longer Charging for Patches to Xbox Live Arcade Games

June 28th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

Raz (Psychonauts)

In a statement to Eurogamer, Microsoft has confirmed that it will no longer charge developers to patch their Xbox Live Arcade games. "Microsoft eliminated fees to Title Updates on Xbox 360 Arcade games in April 2013," explained a Microsoft spokesperson. "We're constantly evaluating our policies and implementing feedback.

"While our development policies are confidential, and will remain so, we're pleased to say that this is just one of many ongoing changes and improvements we've made to ensure Xbox is the best place possible for developers and gamers."

Since the launch of the Xbox 360 in 2006, Microsoft's policy had been to allow developers to patch their games once for free and then charge for any subsequent updates. The Redmond party line has been, until now, that its policies encourage thorough quality assurance from developers.

"Fez" developer Phil Fish (in)famously pegged the cost of an Xbox Live patch at "tens of thousands of dollars," while Double Fine head Tim Schafer pinpoints the figure at $40,000 in an interview last year with Hookshot. Both studios have been explicit about certification costs as a reason to move away from the Xbox platform: "Fez 2" won't be coming to the Xbox One, and Double Fine have moved to Kickstarter as a consistent source of funding.

Microsoft's official statement and  confirmation of the policy change come only after several sources in the development community discussed it with Eurogamer. According to that report, Microsoft's new policy includes retail games as well, though the company's statement only refers explicitly to Xbox Live Arcade titles.

Also according to Eurogamer, Microsoft still reserves the right to charge for title updates and re-certification if it deems a developers submissions "excessive."

One thing I don't understand is why Microsoft are course-correcting now, seven years into the life of the Xbox 360 and only a few months away from the release of the Xbox One. The whole thing seems a day late and a dollar short, not to mention that the switch was flipped in April and never publicized it.

What does the policy change mean for audiences, though? Hopefully, that Xbox Live Arcade development is a little cost prohibitive for small studios, and that patchable issues can be solved quickly and more effectively moving forward.  Meanwhile, there's no word on how this policy change will affect the Xbox One, but it does little to change the fact that studios still aren't allowed to self-published on either Xbox.

[Eurogamer]

Related Posts
Free Games on Xbox Live Set for 1st and 16th of Every Month
Xbox One-Eighty -- Microsoft Acquiesces on 'Always On'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , ,

Microsoft No Longer Charging for Patches to Xbox Live Arcade Games

June 28th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

Raz (Psychonauts)

In a statement to Eurogamer, Microsoft has confirmed that it will no longer charge developers to patch their Xbox Live Arcade games. "Microsoft eliminated fees to Title Updates on Xbox 360 Arcade games in April 2013," explained a Microsoft spokesperson. "We're constantly evaluating our policies and implementing feedback.

"While our development policies are confidential, and will remain so, we're pleased to say that this is just one of many ongoing changes and improvements we've made to ensure Xbox is the best place possible for developers and gamers."

Since the launch of the Xbox 360 in 2006, Microsoft's policy had been to allow developers to patch their games once for free and then charge for any subsequent updates. The Redmond party line has been, until now, that its policies encourage thorough quality assurance from developers.

"Fez" developer Phil Fish (in)famously pegged the cost of an Xbox Live patch at "tens of thousands of dollars," while Double Fine head Tim Schafer pinpoints the figure at $40,000 in an interview last year with Hookshot. Both studios have been explicit about certification costs as a reason to move away from the Xbox platform: "Fez 2" won't be coming to the Xbox One, and Double Fine have moved to Kickstarter as a consistent source of funding.

Microsoft's official statement and  confirmation of the policy change come only after several sources in the development community discussed it with Eurogamer. According to that report, Microsoft's new policy includes retail games as well, though the company's statement only refers explicitly to Xbox Live Arcade titles.

Also according to Eurogamer, Microsoft still reserves the right to charge for title updates and re-certification if it deems a developers submissions "excessive."

One thing I don't understand is why Microsoft are course-correcting now, seven years into the life of the Xbox 360 and only a few months away from the release of the Xbox One. The whole thing seems a day late and a dollar short, not to mention that the switch was flipped in April and never publicized it.

What does the policy change mean for audiences, though? Hopefully, that Xbox Live Arcade development is a little cost prohibitive for small studios, and that patchable issues can be solved quickly and more effectively moving forward.  Meanwhile, there's no word on how this policy change will affect the Xbox One, but it does little to change the fact that studios still aren't allowed to self-published on either Xbox.

[Eurogamer]

Related Posts
Free Games on Xbox Live Set for 1st and 16th of Every Month
Xbox One-Eighty -- Microsoft Acquiesces on 'Always On'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , ,

Ahead of Xbox One, Time Warner Cable brings 300 live channels to Xbox 360

June 28th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Microsoft announced a deal with Time Warner Cable that will bring a ton of live channels to Xbox 360 owners, the company announced today.

With all the emphasis on Microsoft’s mission to make the Xbox One the go-to device for watching cable TV, it’s nice to see that it hasn’t forgotten about the Xbox 360. The move follows similar partnerships Microsoft has made to bring live TV programming to the Xbox 360 from Verizon’s FiOS and Comcast’s Xfinity TV.

The TWC deal will bring over 300 live channels to the Xbox 360, provided you’ve paid for an Xbox Live Gold membership. Some of those channels include AMC, BBC World News, Bravo, Cartoon Network, CNN, Comedy Central, Food Network, HGTV, and others. (I’m guessing that this includes all the channels currently available on TWC’s iOS apps, which is pretty much everything except for the local broadcast stations, aka affiliates for ABC, CBS, Fox, CW, etc.)

The TWC live channels are only available to those with a cable TV subscription, and should be available on Xbox 360 later this summer, according to the company.

This isn’t the first time TWC has made their live channels available on a set-top box. The company first made a deal to bring those live channels to Roku devices earlier this year, which, honestly, provides a better TV watching experience than you’d get via the rental cable boxes provided by TWC.

Speaking of rental boxes, there is some speculation that this Xbox 360/TWC deal is a precursor to a bigger partnership that would allow people to get an Xbox One at a lower price by paying a subscription fee through a cable/Internet service provider. Right now the Xbox One retails for $499, but with subsidies that price could be much lower.

“It occurs to me that Microsoft has a ton of really smart people, and I think the $499 price point was set in anticipation of a subsidy from an Internet service provider,” said Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter in a Facebook status update. “I expect to hear about a $199 Xbox One soon, and I think that the criticism of the price will cease right after. Hoping I’m right, it would be great to see a rapid adoption of the next generation, good for everybody.”

Would you be more inclined to buy a Xbox One for a lower price if you had to go through your cable provider? Let us know in the comments.


Filed under: Business, Games, Media
    


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‘Tiny Tina’s Assault on Dragon Keep’ DLC Review — A Natural 20

June 25th, 2013 No comments

tiny-tinas-assault-on-dragons-keep-1

The final DLC for the loot and shoot sequel has finally been released. While I've had my problems with past add-ons, there is something to be said with Gearbox's dedication to bring more and more of what fans love. Promising more of everything, this last quest thrusts your fearless vault hunter (and three friends) into a fantastical world of high adventure -- all wrapped up inside the mind of a disturbed child.

If you read my previous impressions, you'll know that this is a bit of a departure from the standard fare. Here's a quick recap -- Lilith, Brick, and Mordecai are coerced by Tiny Tina into a "Dungeons & Dragons" rip-off called "Bunkers & Baddassess" with Tina acting as the "Bunker Master." It's all very tongue in cheek and much of the humor derives from the old guard bemoaning this nerdy table top game. That's one half of the story, the other takes a more somber tone as Tiny Tina comes to terms with the death of a pal and learns to move on. Check out the beginning of the campaign in the video below and you'll get the gist of what to expect.

Of course, this all just a vehicle to get your character to an exotic location and murder everything in sight. Your quest takes you from the stony shores to a bustling village towards forests, mines, and ultimately the evil wizard's tower. In a neat twist, the events unfold in parallel to the vanilla mission to thwart Handsome Jack. It's a retelling of sorts wrapped in a slick, classic RPG skin.

Story aside, the gameplay is exactly as you would expect "Borderlands" to be -- you'll find hordes of creatures, loot their corpses, and then kill bigger, badder creatures for bigger, badder loot per nausea. The biggest change comes from the types of enemies. Orcs, skeletons, giant spiders, treants, knights, paladins, wizards and any number of other mythical creatures that would fit right at home airbrushed on the side of a 1970's van. Though a good deal of the bestiary is melee, many of the baddies have ranged attacks from magic missiles to fire arrows so you'll still find plenty of challenge. This being said, I found the latest Vault hunter -- Krieg -- to be especially fun given his focus beating the living crap out of anything that moves. Obviously, you don't need him to play but his style is perfect for the add-on missions.

The designs are what the real charm comes from in this DLC, with new details and textures and effects. Gearbox has really polished the season's worth of content and it really shows with their attention to detail. From dark, mystifying forests to thatched taverns, the "TTAODK" artists really knock it out of park with the visual treatment. It's as if the squad had stepped into their very own LARP and is just having a ball.

tiny-tinas-assault-on-dragons-keep-2

Missions a hodgepodge of the usual fare -- but more of the one off quick humor quests appear and add a lot of the comic relief. Speaking of which, this DLC probably has more dialogue in it than the other DLCs combined. Since the original cast is role playing, they often chime in with suggestions on how to proceed with the story. As a bonus, fans of table top gaming will be privy to the more esoteric puns and humor. Really, "TTAODK" is a swan song to fans of both genres and to the story of Tiny Tina as well.

Though the campaign is substantial and there are tons of side quests, my gripes about "Borderlands 2" still make an appearance. The monotonous, single-minded gameplay can wear thin at times and if you've already leveled up several characters there's not much more to do after the humor and wit have been spent. But with a few friends you'll find plenty to love about "Assault on Dragon's Keep."

'Tiny Tina's Assault On Dragon Keep' -- Score 4 out of 5

'Tiny Tina's Assault On Dragon Keep' is available for PC, PS3, and Xbox 360. It's included in the Season Pass but can be purchased separately for $9.99 or 800MSP.

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‘Tiny Tina’s Assault on Dragon Keep’ DLC Review — A Natural 20

June 25th, 2013 No comments

tiny-tinas-assault-on-dragons-keep-1

The final DLC for the loot and shoot sequel has finally been released. While I've had my problems with past add-ons, there is something to be said with Gearbox's dedication to bring more and more of what fans love. Promising more of everything, this last quest thrusts your fearless vault hunter (and three friends) into a fantastical world of high adventure -- all wrapped up inside the mind of a disturbed child.

If you read my previous impressions, you'll know that this is a bit of a departure from the standard fare. Here's a quick recap -- Lilith, Brick, and Mordecai are coerced by Tiny Tina into a "Dungeons & Dragons" rip-off called "Bunkers & Baddassess" with Tina acting as the "Bunker Master." It's all very tongue in cheek and much of the humor derives from the old guard bemoaning this nerdy table top game. That's one half of the story, the other takes a more somber tone as Tiny Tina comes to terms with the death of a pal and learns to move on. Check out the beginning of the campaign in the video below and you'll get the gist of what to expect.

Of course, this all just a vehicle to get your character to an exotic location and murder everything in sight. Your quest takes you from the stony shores to a bustling village towards forests, mines, and ultimately the evil wizard's tower. In a neat twist, the events unfold in parallel to the vanilla mission to thwart Handsome Jack. It's a retelling of sorts wrapped in a slick, classic RPG skin.

Story aside, the gameplay is exactly as you would expect "Borderlands" to be -- you'll find hordes of creatures, loot their corpses, and then kill bigger, badder creatures for bigger, badder loot per nausea. The biggest change comes from the types of enemies. Orcs, skeletons, giant spiders, treants, knights, paladins, wizards and any number of other mythical creatures that would fit right at home airbrushed on the side of a 1970's van. Though a good deal of the bestiary is melee, many of the baddies have ranged attacks from magic missiles to fire arrows so you'll still find plenty of challenge. This being said, I found the latest Vault hunter -- Krieg -- to be especially fun given his focus beating the living crap out of anything that moves. Obviously, you don't need him to play but his style is perfect for the add-on missions.

The designs are what the real charm comes from in this DLC, with new details and textures and effects. Gearbox has really polished the season's worth of content and it really shows with their attention to detail. From dark, mystifying forests to thatched taverns, the "TTAODK" artists really knock it out of park with the visual treatment. It's as if the squad had stepped into their very own LARP and is just having a ball.

tiny-tinas-assault-on-dragons-keep-2

Missions a hodgepodge of the usual fare -- but more of the one off quick humor quests appear and add a lot of the comic relief. Speaking of which, this DLC probably has more dialogue in it than the other DLCs combined. Since the original cast is role playing, they often chime in with suggestions on how to proceed with the story. As a bonus, fans of table top gaming will be privy to the more esoteric puns and humor. Really, "TTAODK" is a swan song to fans of both genres and to the story of Tiny Tina as well.

Though the campaign is substantial and there are tons of side quests, my gripes about "Borderlands 2" still make an appearance. The monotonous, single-minded gameplay can wear thin at times and if you've already leveled up several characters there's not much more to do after the humor and wit have been spent. But with a few friends you'll find plenty to love about "Assault on Dragon's Keep."

'Tiny Tina's Assault On Dragon Keep' -- Score 4 out of 5

'Tiny Tina's Assault On Dragon Keep' is available for PC, PS3, and Xbox 360. It's included in the Season Pass but can be purchased separately for $9.99 or 800MSP.

Related Posts
Official: 'Hotline Miami' En Route to PlayStation Network for PS3 and Vita This Week, with Exclusive New Mask
Bethesda Talks 'Prey 2' and New 'Fallout' And Neither Are Coming Out Any Time Soon

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