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Archive

Posts Tagged ‘video’

Old School, Flight School: ‘Strike Vector’ Is Your Shiny New Dogfighting Mech Game

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

I was pretty enamored with "EVR," the Oculus Rift space-dogfighting game by CCP, when I played it earlier this year. The decline of the flight sim genre has been well-documented, and it's not often enough that people get to suit up, strap in, and blow each other up into teensy-tiny smithereens.

Alas, there's no release date in sight for the Oculus Rift. What's a boy to do? Enter "Strike Vector."

The skinny: "Strike Vector" is a multiplayer arena combat game made in ten months by the four people at the appropriately-named Team Strike using Unreal Engine 3.

In a word, the game looks good, its floating oil rigs and slumtowns dense and detailed. There's some sort of dystopian backstory about mercenary fighter pilots working for mega-corporations, but the important thing is being able to swoop in and out of post-industrial nooks and crannies in search of people to explode.

Here's the hook: each Vector -- i.e., ship -- can be flown in either "jet mode" or "hover mode." Jet mode is self-explanatory: zoom around, shoot missiles, make Top Gun jokes. In hover mode, however, "Strike Vector" plays more like a first-person mech-style game: you can strafe, turn in 360 degrees, and use ironsights.

Destructible environments and customizable ships round out "Strike Vector"'s list of features, the sum of which seem designed to provide plenty of variables to make each match dynamic, or at least new-feeling. There's more information on the game's official site.

So, to recap: "Yes" to dogfighting games, "yes" to impressive efforts from tiny indie studios, "yes" to finding a new term besides "dogfight" to describe videogames about airplane combat. I'm always afraid people are going to think that there are games out there about actual illegal dog fighting. Spaceships and lasers are way better.

"Strike Vector" probably won't be ready until 2014, but until then, there's a Steam Greenlight page.

[Steam Greenlight]

Related Posts
I Wonder Why CCP Brought Their Oculus Rift Dogfighting Game 'EVR' to E3
Vlambeer Officially Announces Stylish Figther Pilot Game 'Luftrausers' for Vita and PS3

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Old School, Flight School: ‘Strike Vector’ Is Your Shiny New Dogfighting Mech Game

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

I was pretty enamored with "EVR," the Oculus Rift space-dogfighting game by CCP, when I played it earlier this year. The decline of the flight sim genre has been well-documented, and it's not often enough that people get to suit up, strap in, and blow each other up into teensy-tiny smithereens.

Alas, there's no release date in sight for the Oculus Rift. What's a boy to do? Enter "Strike Vector."

The skinny: "Strike Vector" is a multiplayer arena combat game made in ten months by the four people at the appropriately-named Team Strike using Unreal Engine 3.

In a word, the game looks good, its floating oil rigs and slumtowns dense and detailed. There's some sort of dystopian backstory about mercenary fighter pilots working for mega-corporations, but the important thing is being able to swoop in and out of post-industrial nooks and crannies in search of people to explode.

Here's the hook: each Vector -- i.e., ship -- can be flown in either "jet mode" or "hover mode." Jet mode is self-explanatory: zoom around, shoot missiles, make Top Gun jokes. In hover mode, however, "Strike Vector" plays more like a first-person mech-style game: you can strafe, turn in 360 degrees, and use ironsights.

Destructible environments and customizable ships round out "Strike Vector"'s list of features, the sum of which seem designed to provide plenty of variables to make each match dynamic, or at least new-feeling. There's more information on the game's official site.

So, to recap: "Yes" to dogfighting games, "yes" to impressive efforts from tiny indie studios, "yes" to finding a new term besides "dogfight" to describe videogames about airplane combat. I'm always afraid people are going to think that there are games out there about actual illegal dog fighting. Spaceships and lasers are way better.

"Strike Vector" probably won't be ready until 2014, but until then, there's a Steam Greenlight page.

[Steam Greenlight]

Related Posts
I Wonder Why CCP Brought Their Oculus Rift Dogfighting Game 'EVR' to E3
Vlambeer Officially Announces Stylish Figther Pilot Game 'Luftrausers' for Vita and PS3

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , ,

Old School, Flight School: ‘Strike Vector’ Is Your Shiny New Dogfighting Mech Game

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

I was pretty enamored with "EVR," the Oculus Rift space-dogfighting game by CCP, when I played it earlier this year. The decline of the flight sim genre has been well-documented, and it's not often enough that people get to suit up, strap in, and blow each other up into teensy-tiny smithereens.

Alas, there's no release date in sight for the Oculus Rift. What's a boy to do? Enter "Strike Vector."

The skinny: "Strike Vector" is a multiplayer arena combat game made in ten months by the four people at the appropriately-named Team Strike using Unreal Engine 3.

In a word, the game looks good, its floating oil rigs and slumtowns dense and detailed. There's some sort of dystopian backstory about mercenary fighter pilots working for mega-corporations, but the important thing is being able to swoop in and out of post-industrial nooks and crannies in search of people to explode.

Here's the hook: each Vector -- i.e., ship -- can be flown in either "jet mode" or "hover mode." Jet mode is self-explanatory: zoom around, shoot missiles, make Top Gun jokes. In hover mode, however, "Strike Vector" plays more like a first-person mech-style game: you can strafe, turn in 360 degrees, and use ironsights.

Destructible environments and customizable ships round out "Strike Vector"'s list of features, the sum of which seem designed to provide plenty of variables to make each match dynamic, or at least new-feeling. There's more information on the game's official site.

So, to recap: "Yes" to dogfighting games, "yes" to impressive efforts from tiny indie studios, "yes" to finding a new term besides "dogfight" to describe videogames about airplane combat. I'm always afraid people are going to think that there are games out there about actual illegal dog fighting. Spaceships and lasers are way better.

"Strike Vector" probably won't be ready until 2014, but until then, there's a Steam Greenlight page.

[Steam Greenlight]

Related Posts
I Wonder Why CCP Brought Their Oculus Rift Dogfighting Game 'EVR' to E3
Vlambeer Officially Announces Stylish Figther Pilot Game 'Luftrausers' for Vita and PS3

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Handful of New ‘Killer is Dead’ Trailers Introduce Bosses and (Kinda Sexist) Mondo Girls

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

The last time I checked on "Killer is Dead," Grasshopper Manufacture's imminent future-noir curio, director Goichi Suda was ruminating on his appreciation of television and how it's influenced the structure and marketing of his game. Since then, though, publisher XSEED has released three new trailers that have somehow slipped between my cybernetic hyper-fingers.

"Killer is Dead" has garnered a fair amount of buzz on the strength of its visual style, Suda 51's institutional flair, and the fact that protagonist Mondo Zappa has a robot arm and gets to go to the Moon. The third trailer introduces some things I'm -- pardon the pun -- less jazzed about. Namely, the game's Mondo Girls, a group of women included in the game as an homage to 007's traditional Bond Girls.

Real talk: Bond's vaguely non-consensual sexual encounter with Sévérine (I had to look her name up) -- and her subsequent murder -- are the crudest, skeeziest, most retrograde, and most boring parts of Skyfall. That there are a set of Mondo Girls that exist in "Killer is Dead" solely to provide titillation is gross. That Mondo has a set of "Gigolo Glasses" that allow him to see through these women's clothes is creepy, voyeuristic, and predatory.

My understanding is that there "Scarlett Missions" that task Mondo with certain objectives -- killing enemies in a given amount of time, or using only a specific weapon. The reward, this trailer suggests, is sex.

There are two different, but related, ideas at play. The first is that sex is something that can be given or withheld as an incentive for men. The second is that women can be unlocked like puzzle boxes: perform the right actions in the right order and the right time, and the prize is yours. Both of these are incredibly demeaning, but they're on display, front-and-center, in the third trailer for "Killer is Dead" -- sex isn't a Rubik's Cube, y'all.

Here's Suda, speaking to Games Industry: "Sexuality is a touchy subject. We don't want to make people offended, but we're trying to create something that makes people laugh a bit because we're [dealing with] that topic."

Requisite benefit of the doubt paragraph: "Killer is Dead" isn't out yet, so it may yet be more nuanced and less objectifying than these trailers let on. Vivienne Squall, Mondo's in-game boss, also seems like a fun character -- she's sassy, smart, and can shoot 16 akimbo pistols at once, apparently. She was introduced in an earlier trailer.

Moving on! The fourth trailer for "Killer is Dead" disappointingly drops the episodic conceit of the earlier ones and opts for straight-up E3 bombast: campy, futuristic gore set to Chopin's Étude no. 3, in E major. (Fun fact: Grasshopper has previously used Dvořák’s New World Symphony and Wagner's Flight of the Valkyries for "Killer is Dead" trailers. It's becoming A Thing.)

The fifth, and most recent, trailer for the game introduces David, who's kind of rocking an Amon Ra-type headdress-slash-codpiece. What I like about both of these is how self-aware they are: Suda breaks the fourth wall and throws out spoilers with gleeful abandon (hint: everybody dies), confident in the fact that his aesthetic overwhelms and assimilates it all into one big gonzo amalgam.

Still, for all its style and eye-winking knowingness, "Killer is Dead" has been hampered -- as far as my internal hype-train goes -- by the presence of the Mondo Girls. As often as Suda sets his sights on pillorying pop culture, a bit of interrogation into women-as-sex-puzzle would be a nice surprise.

"Killer is Dead" is set for an August release for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3.

Related Posts
Suda 51's 'Black Knight Sword' Half Off This Week On XBLA
'Killer is Dead' Still To Be Published By XSEED

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Handful of New ‘Killer is Dead’ Trailers Introduce Bosses and (Kinda Sexist) Mondo Girls

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

The last time I checked on "Killer is Dead," Grasshopper Manufacture's imminent future-noir curio, director Goichi Suda was ruminating on his appreciation of television and how it's influenced the structure and marketing of his game. Since then, though, publisher XSEED has released three new trailers that have somehow slipped between my cybernetic hyper-fingers.

"Killer is Dead" has garnered a fair amount of buzz on the strength of its visual style, Suda 51's institutional flair, and the fact that protagonist Mondo Zappa has a robot arm and gets to go to the Moon. The third trailer introduces some things I'm -- pardon the pun -- less jazzed about. Namely, the game's Mondo Girls, a group of women included in the game as an homage to 007's traditional Bond Girls.

Real talk: Bond's vaguely non-consensual sexual encounter with Sévérine (I had to look her name up) -- and her subsequent murder -- are the crudest, skeeziest, most retrograde, and most boring parts of Skyfall. That there are a set of Mondo Girls that exist in "Killer is Dead" solely to provide titillation is gross. That Mondo has a set of "Gigolo Glasses" that allow him to see through these women's clothes is creepy, voyeuristic, and predatory.

My understanding is that there "Scarlett Missions" that task Mondo with certain objectives -- killing enemies in a given amount of time, or using only a specific weapon. The reward, this trailer suggests, is sex.

There are two different, but related, ideas at play. The first is that sex is something that can be given or withheld as an incentive for men. The second is that women can be unlocked like puzzle boxes: perform the right actions in the right order and the right time, and the prize is yours. Both of these are incredibly demeaning, but they're on display, front-and-center, in the third trailer for "Killer is Dead" -- sex isn't a Rubik's Cube, y'all.

Here's Suda, speaking to Games Industry: "Sexuality is a touchy subject. We don't want to make people offended, but we're trying to create something that makes people laugh a bit because we're [dealing with] that topic."

Requisite benefit of the doubt paragraph: "Killer is Dead" isn't out yet, so it may yet be more nuanced and less objectifying than these trailers let on. Vivienne Squall, Mondo's in-game boss, also seems like a fun character -- she's sassy, smart, and can shoot 16 akimbo pistols at once, apparently. She was introduced in an earlier trailer.

Moving on! The fourth trailer for "Killer is Dead" disappointingly drops the episodic conceit of the earlier ones and opts for straight-up E3 bombast: campy, futuristic gore set to Chopin's Étude no. 3, in E major. (Fun fact: Grasshopper has previously used Dvořák’s New World Symphony and Wagner's Flight of the Valkyries for "Killer is Dead" trailers. It's becoming A Thing.)

The fifth, and most recent, trailer for the game introduces David, who's kind of rocking an Amon Ra-type headdress-slash-codpiece. What I like about both of these is how self-aware they are: Suda breaks the fourth wall and throws out spoilers with gleeful abandon (hint: everybody dies), confident in the fact that his aesthetic overwhelms and assimilates it all into one big gonzo amalgam.

Still, for all its style and eye-winking knowingness, "Killer is Dead" has been hampered -- as far as my internal hype-train goes -- by the presence of the Mondo Girls. As often as Suda sets his sights on pillorying pop culture, a bit of interrogation into women-as-sex-puzzle would be a nice surprise.

"Killer is Dead" is set for an August release for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3.

Related Posts
Suda 51's 'Black Knight Sword' Half Off This Week On XBLA
'Killer is Dead' Still To Be Published By XSEED

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , ,

I Feel the Cosmos: Life-Sized Yoga Ball-Controlled ‘Katamari Damacy’ Charms Art Festival

June 27th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

You know what's cool? Art installations that are wired up to let people play a life-sized version of "Katamari Damacy," Keita Takahashi's whimsical dreamscape-meets-social-commentary, using a giant yoga ball. Using a projector, an Arduino circuit board, and some optical mouses, Über Cool Stuff owner and do-it-yourselfer Chris McInnis debuted the project at London, Ontario's Nuit Blanche art festival a few weekends ago.

It's worth noting that the idea for a life-sized katamari has been rolling around (get it?!) for a while now: McInnis got the idea from a hacker named Kellbot. The basic principle is to replace the PlayStation 2's analog sticks with an optical mouse that can read the yoga ball's movement and then send that signal to the game.

In any case, McInnis roped in other woodworkers, coders, electricians, and artists and eventually got the project working, complimented by some papier-mâché katamari and King of All Cosmos costumes. If the above video is any indication, it seems like yoga ball "Katamari" was a treat for young and old players alike.

While this particular "Katamari" hack might be a one-off installation for Nuit Blanche, it actually fits into a larger trend of making big, public, physical games. McInnis' project actually reminds me of Douglas Wilson and Bennett Foddy's work on games like "Johann Sebastian Joust" and "Mega GIRP," or even WallFour's "Renga" project.

Be sure to check out McInnis' site for more photos, technical walkthroughs, and information on the yoga ball katamari project.

[ÜberCoolStuff via Destructoid]

Related Posts
16 Buttons, Pee, And A Bossy Parrot Are Part Of 'Katamari Damacy' Creator Takahashi's 'Tenya Wanya Teens'
'‘Katamari’ Creator Teases ‘Tenya Wanya Teens,’ a Multiplayer Party Game About Adolescence

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , ,

I Feel the Cosmos: Life-Sized Yoga Ball-Controlled ‘Katamari Damacy’ Charms Art Festival

June 27th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

You know what's cool? Art installations that are wired up to let people play a life-sized version of "Katamari Damacy," Keita Takahashi's whimsical dreamscape-meets-social-commentary, using a giant yoga ball. Using a projector, an Arduino circuit board, and some optical mouses, Über Cool Stuff owner and do-it-yourselfer Chris McInnis debuted the project at London, Ontario's Nuit Blanche art festival a few weekends ago.

It's worth noting that the idea for a life-sized katamari has been rolling around (get it?!) for a while now: McInnis got the idea from a hacker named Kellbot. The basic principle is to replace the PlayStation 2's analog sticks with an optical mouse that can read the yoga ball's movement and then send that signal to the game.

In any case, McInnis roped in other woodworkers, coders, electricians, and artists and eventually got the project working, complimented by some papier-mâché katamari and King of All Cosmos costumes. If the above video is any indication, it seems like yoga ball "Katamari" was a treat for young and old players alike.

While this particular "Katamari" hack might be a one-off installation for Nuit Blanche, it actually fits into a larger trend of making big, public, physical games. McInnis' project actually reminds me of Douglas Wilson and Bennett Foddy's work on games like "Johann Sebastian Joust" and "Mega GIRP," or even WallFour's "Renga" project.

Be sure to check out McInnis' site for more photos, technical walkthroughs, and information on the yoga ball katamari project.

[ÜberCoolStuff via Destructoid]

Related Posts
16 Buttons, Pee, And A Bossy Parrot Are Part Of 'Katamari Damacy' Creator Takahashi's 'Tenya Wanya Teens'
'‘Katamari’ Creator Teases ‘Tenya Wanya Teens,’ a Multiplayer Party Game About Adolescence

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , ,

I Feel the Cosmos: Life-Sized Yoga Ball-Controlled ‘Katamari Damacy’ Charms Art Festival

June 27th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

You know what's cool? Art installations that are wired up to let people play a life-sized version of "Katamari Damacy," Keita Takahashi's whimsical dreamscape-meets-social-commentary, using a giant yoga ball. Using a projector, an Arduino circuit board, and some optical mouses, Über Cool Stuff owner and do-it-yourselfer Chris McInnis debuted the project at London, Ontario's Nuit Blanche art festival a few weekends ago.

It's worth noting that the idea for a life-sized katamari has been rolling around (get it?!) for a while now: McInnis got the idea from a hacker named Kellbot. The basic principle is to replace the PlayStation 2's analog sticks with an optical mouse that can read the yoga ball's movement and then send that signal to the game.

In any case, McInnis roped in other woodworkers, coders, electricians, and artists and eventually got the project working, complimented by some papier-mâché katamari and King of All Cosmos costumes. If the above video is any indication, it seems like yoga ball "Katamari" was a treat for young and old players alike.

While this particular "Katamari" hack might be a one-off installation for Nuit Blanche, it actually fits into a larger trend of making big, public, physical games. McInnis' project actually reminds me of Douglas Wilson and Bennett Foddy's work on games like "Johann Sebastian Joust" and "Mega GIRP," or even WallFour's "Renga" project.

Be sure to check out McInnis' site for more photos, technical walkthroughs, and information on the yoga ball katamari project.

[ÜberCoolStuff via Destructoid]

Related Posts
16 Buttons, Pee, And A Bossy Parrot Are Part Of 'Katamari Damacy' Creator Takahashi's 'Tenya Wanya Teens'
'‘Katamari’ Creator Teases ‘Tenya Wanya Teens,’ a Multiplayer Party Game About Adolescence

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , ,

Abandon All Hope: ‘Malebolgia’ Trailer is Unnerving Nightmare Fuel (But So Pretty!)

June 25th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

"Malbolgia" is kind of ten-dollar word, but it comes to English courtesy of poet and consumate Florentine Dante Alighieri.

In the first part of his Divine Comedy, the "Inferno," Dante sketches out the various levels of hell and describes which types of sinners, evil-doers, and malefactors go where. The eighth circle is called the Malebolge, a series a deep, dark trenches called malebolgia, in Italian.

This is relevant because Belgian indie developer Dascu Maru just released a trailer for a cel-shaded, third-person nightmare machine called "Malebolgia." It's not gory or disturbing or gruesome, but it is unrelenting in its textureless, low-poly aesthetic, its shadows, and its Gregorian chanting.

The chanting is what really does it for me: reverberating echoes of exorcisms, of eldritch succubi preying on weak human flesh, of the Inquisition.

According to the video's description -- Dascu doesn't seem to have much an online presence, regrettably -- "Malebolgia" is an action-adventure game set in a demonic fortress, inspired by Gothic literature and Dante's previously-mentioned "Inferno." In fact, I think Dascu is selling him- or herself short: a screen shot posted to his Twitter account shows some sort of uniformed officer reading the opening lines of Dante's masterwork.

Malebogia

"Malebolgia" is being made in Unity and hopes to be released later this year. A Kickstarter campaign is the works to help pay for licensing fees and Dascu plans on setting up a Greenlight page. Here's hoping "Malebolgia" has higher (or deeper) aspirations than some other Dante-related games out there.

[@dascumaru via Indie Statik]

Related Posts
Overhaul Games Still Interested in 'Baldur's Gate III' Despite Recent Legal Struggles
'Transistor' Gameplay Natural Fit for Sci-Fi Setting, says Designer

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , , , ,

Abandon All Hope: ‘Malebolgia’ Trailer is Unnerving Nightmare Fuel (But So Pretty!)

June 25th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

"Malbolgia" is kind of ten-dollar word, but it comes to English courtesy of poet and consumate Florentine Dante Alighieri.

In the first part of his Divine Comedy, the "Inferno," Dante sketches out the various levels of hell and describes which types of sinners, evil-doers, and malefactors go where. The eighth circle is called the Malebolge, a series a deep, dark trenches called malebolgia, in Italian.

This is relevant because Belgian indie developer Dascu Maru just released a trailer for a cel-shaded, third-person nightmare machine called "Malebolgia." It's not gory or disturbing or gruesome, but it is unrelenting in its textureless, low-poly aesthetic, its shadows, and its Gregorian chanting.

The chanting is what really does it for me: reverberating echoes of exorcisms, of eldritch succubi preying on weak human flesh, of the Inquisition.

According to the video's description -- Dascu doesn't seem to have much an online presence, regrettably -- "Malebolgia" is an action-adventure game set in a demonic fortress, inspired by Gothic literature and Dante's previously-mentioned "Inferno." In fact, I think Dascu is selling him- or herself short: a screen shot posted to his Twitter account shows some sort of uniformed officer reading the opening lines of Dante's masterwork.

Malebogia

"Malebolgia" is being made in Unity and hopes to be released later this year. A Kickstarter campaign is the works to help pay for licensing fees and Dascu plans on setting up a Greenlight page. Here's hoping "Malebolgia" has higher (or deeper) aspirations than some other Dante-related games out there.

[@dascumaru via Indie Statik]

Related Posts
Overhaul Games Still Interested in 'Baldur's Gate III' Despite Recent Legal Struggles
'Transistor' Gameplay Natural Fit for Sci-Fi Setting, says Designer

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , , , ,

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