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Posts Tagged ‘Review’

‘Rogue Legacy’ Review (PC) — Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again…

July 1st, 2013 No comments

rogue-legacy-2
[Source]

Take equal parts "Castlevania," "Ghost 'n' Goblins," and "The Binding of Isaac," mix in some basic middle school biology and you'll get "Rogue Legacy." Developer Cellar Door Games -- the creators of "Villainous" and "Don't Shit Your Pants" -- hone their development skills on a game much larger in scope. Described as a rogue-lite, "Rogue Legacy" serves up a standard platformer/RPG with a fun twist -- your sons and daughters take up the mantle of hero after you die.

The story is your standard RPG fare. Basically, you're out to avenge the death of your king who was betrayed by his finest knight. It's pretty bare bones but enough is there to keep pushing you forward. You'll also find journals written from the betrayer's view as his mind begins to deteriorate from having been locked away in this magical fortress for some time. Eventually, there is a big reveal of sorts but it's nothing particularly thought provoking.

Gameplay flows along most platformer conventions -- jumping, slashing, collecting items and coins, and, of course, besting bosses. The twist comes from the high difficulty and randomness of the castle layout. Typically in Rogue-likes -- once you're dead that's it. Game over. However, "Legacy" mercifully grants a few points in your favor. You can choose a new character (from three potential offspring) upon restarting, and you carry over any gold, weapon blueprints, and stat increases from previous runs. This does take a bit of the utter chaos that can befall players of other rogue-likes out of the equation while still retaining the classic brutality of similar games.

rogue-legacy-1
[Source]

What separates this from other hack in slash platformers (like "Ghouls 'n' Ghosts" of "Castlevania: Symphony of the Night") is the randomization of the castle. Each time you venture forth, you must pay Charon to enter. The Castle is then reloaded with a new map -- though some things remain the same. The forest, dungeon and tower areas will be accessed according to their general locations -- East, South, and North respectively. Each area has a special boss enemy which isn't randomized either.

Outside the castle walls, you can buy upgrades and expand your heroes' manor using gold. Upgrades range from basic stats increases to unlockable classes. Additionally, you can employ help by purchasing a smith, enchantress, and architect. The smith will create new equipment, while the enchantress allows you to equip magical runes. These magical artifacts can be equipped in addition to armor and they alter your characters' abilities -- such as multiple air jumps, absorb HP/MP from kills, and even raising or lowering the enemy difficulty. The architect is unique such that he can "lock" the previous castles' layout so that the map doesn't change -- though this comes at only being able to collect gold at 70% its normal rate. This all means that there's a fairly deep level of customization to better prepare yourself for your next run.

There's also a good bit of humor thrown in -- much of it manifesting as unique genetic traits. For instance, one trait inverts the display forcing you to think upside-down as your character walks on the "ceiling." Other genetic oddities includes gigantism (makes you huge), dwarfism (makes you tiny) and dyslexia (obfuscates in-game text). It's played for laughs but many of the traits effect gameplay enough that you'll need to carefully read the character sheet. I found myself spec'ing towards a particular play style as Spellswords and Barbarians become my bread and butter.

Unfortunately, these pigeon-holes you into only picking a few of your favorite types but thankfully you can always upgrade abilities and stats with gold collected. Though, these get rather expensive as each new level increases by hundreds of gold. Likewise, the high concept of genetic legacy falls a bit short as the idea isn't as fleshed out as I would have liked. It could have been really neat if your stats upgraded through gameplay alone rather than devolving into a loot/grind fest. Still, it's polished and fun to play. There's even New Game + (and New Game ++) for the truly addicted players.

rogue-legacy-3
[Source]

The production of "Rogue Legacy" is pretty nice considering the price point. Art assets are sharp and animations are clean enough. The music is one the more charming points as each area of the castle harkens back to previous 8/16/32-bit platformers of yore. The more esoteric genetic traits have wonderful effects -- the nostalgic trait shows the game as filtered through an old timey film grain. Loading tips appear in the form of your kids' final words as they're forever immortalized in a family portrait. Also, depending on how well you performed with a particular child, they'll inherit certain titles such as Legendary -- granted upon defeating a boss -- or Useless -- given upon dying without killing anything. It's all cute and adorable and fits the somewhat lighthearted tone of the game.

Despite the grind fest and somewhat limited boss encounters, the art and charm of "Rogue Legacy" goes above and beyond. Tight controls, interesting RPG gimmick, and fun factor is well worth the time (and money) spent. Those that might be turned off from the devastatingly difficult rogue-likes will find a challenging but fun experience with nods to games long past.

"Rogue Legacy" is available now for $14.99 on PC.

"Rogue Legacy" score -- 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Oddworld' HD Remake Gets a Name, Fall 2013 Release Date
Hideo Kojima Looking for Studio to Remake the Original 'Metal Gear Solid'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , ,

‘Rogue Legacy’ Review (PC) — Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again…

July 1st, 2013 No comments

rogue-legacy-2
[Source]

Take equal parts "Castlevania," "Ghost 'n' Goblins," and "The Binding of Isaac," mix in some basic middle school biology and you'll get "Rogue Legacy." Developer Cellar Door Games -- the creators of "Villainous" and "Don't Shit Your Pants" -- hone their development skills on a game much larger in scope. Described as a rogue-lite, "Rogue Legacy" serves up a standard platformer/RPG with a fun twist -- your sons and daughters take up the mantle of hero after you die.

The story is your standard RPG fare. Basically, you're out to avenge the death of your king who was betrayed by his finest knight. It's pretty bare bones but enough is there to keep pushing you forward. You'll also find journals written from the betrayer's view as his mind begins to deteriorate from having been locked away in this magical fortress for some time. Eventually, there is a big reveal of sorts but it's nothing particularly thought provoking.

Gameplay flows along most platformer conventions -- jumping, slashing, collecting items and coins, and, of course, besting bosses. The twist comes from the high difficulty and randomness of the castle layout. Typically in Rogue-likes -- once you're dead that's it. Game over. However, "Legacy" mercifully grants a few points in your favor. You can choose a new character (from three potential offspring) upon restarting, and you carry over any gold, weapon blueprints, and stat increases from previous runs. This does take a bit of the utter chaos that can befall players of other rogue-likes out of the equation while still retaining the classic brutality of similar games.

rogue-legacy-1
[Source]

What separates this from other hack in slash platformers (like "Ghouls 'n' Ghosts" of "Castlevania: Symphony of the Night") is the randomization of the castle. Each time you venture forth, you must pay Charon to enter. The Castle is then reloaded with a new map -- though some things remain the same. The forest, dungeon and tower areas will be accessed according to their general locations -- East, South, and North respectively. Each area has a special boss enemy which isn't randomized either.

Outside the castle walls, you can buy upgrades and expand your heroes' manor using gold. Upgrades range from basic stats increases to unlockable classes. Additionally, you can employ help by purchasing a smith, enchantress, and architect. The smith will create new equipment, while the enchantress allows you to equip magical runes. These magical artifacts can be equipped in addition to armor and they alter your characters' abilities -- such as multiple air jumps, absorb HP/MP from kills, and even raising or lowering the enemy difficulty. The architect is unique such that he can "lock" the previous castles' layout so that the map doesn't change -- though this comes at only being able to collect gold at 70% its normal rate. This all means that there's a fairly deep level of customization to better prepare yourself for your next run.

There's also a good bit of humor thrown in -- much of it manifesting as unique genetic traits. For instance, one trait inverts the display forcing you to think upside-down as your character walks on the "ceiling." Other genetic oddities includes gigantism (makes you huge), dwarfism (makes you tiny) and dyslexia (obfuscates in-game text). It's played for laughs but many of the traits effect gameplay enough that you'll need to carefully read the character sheet. I found myself spec'ing towards a particular play style as Spellswords and Barbarians become my bread and butter.

Unfortunately, these pigeon-holes you into only picking a few of your favorite types but thankfully you can always upgrade abilities and stats with gold collected. Though, these get rather expensive as each new level increases by hundreds of gold. Likewise, the high concept of genetic legacy falls a bit short as the idea isn't as fleshed out as I would have liked. It could have been really neat if your stats upgraded through gameplay alone rather than devolving into a loot/grind fest. Still, it's polished and fun to play. There's even New Game + (and New Game ++) for the truly addicted players.

rogue-legacy-3
[Source]

The production of "Rogue Legacy" is pretty nice considering the price point. Art assets are sharp and animations are clean enough. The music is one the more charming points as each area of the castle harkens back to previous 8/16/32-bit platformers of yore. The more esoteric genetic traits have wonderful effects -- the nostalgic trait shows the game as filtered through an old timey film grain. Loading tips appear in the form of your kids' final words as they're forever immortalized in a family portrait. Also, depending on how well you performed with a particular child, they'll inherit certain titles such as Legendary -- granted upon defeating a boss -- or Useless -- given upon dying without killing anything. It's all cute and adorable and fits the somewhat lighthearted tone of the game.

Despite the grind fest and somewhat limited boss encounters, the art and charm of "Rogue Legacy" goes above and beyond. Tight controls, interesting RPG gimmick, and fun factor is well worth the time (and money) spent. Those that might be turned off from the devastatingly difficult rogue-likes will find a challenging but fun experience with nods to games long past.

"Rogue Legacy" is available now for $14.99 on PC.

"Rogue Legacy" score -- 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Oddworld' HD Remake Gets a Name, Fall 2013 Release Date
Hideo Kojima Looking for Studio to Remake the Original 'Metal Gear Solid'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , ,

‘Rogue Legacy’ Review (PC) — Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again…

July 1st, 2013 No comments

rogue-legacy-2
[Source]

Take equal parts "Castlevania," "Ghost 'n' Goblins," and "The Binding of Isaac," mix in some basic middle school biology and you'll get "Rogue Legacy." Developer Cellar Door Games -- the creators of "Villainous" and "Don't Shit Your Pants" -- hone their development skills on a game much larger in scope. Described as a rogue-lite, "Rogue Legacy" serves up a standard platformer/RPG with a fun twist -- your sons and daughters take up the mantle of hero after you die.

The story is your standard RPG fare. Basically, you're out to avenge the death of your king who was betrayed by his finest knight. It's pretty bare bones but enough is there to keep pushing you forward. You'll also find journals written from the betrayer's view as his mind begins to deteriorate from having been locked away in this magical fortress for some time. Eventually, there is a big reveal of sorts but it's nothing particularly thought provoking.

Gameplay flows along most platformer conventions -- jumping, slashing, collecting items and coins, and, of course, besting bosses. The twist comes from the high difficulty and randomness of the castle layout. Typically in Rogue-likes -- once you're dead that's it. Game over. However, "Legacy" mercifully grants a few points in your favor. You can choose a new character (from three potential offspring) upon restarting, and you carry over any gold, weapon blueprints, and stat increases from previous runs. This does take a bit of the utter chaos that can befall players of other rogue-likes out of the equation while still retaining the classic brutality of similar games.

rogue-legacy-1
[Source]

What separates this from other hack in slash platformers (like "Ghouls 'n' Ghosts" of "Castlevania: Symphony of the Night") is the randomization of the castle. Each time you venture forth, you must pay Charon to enter. The Castle is then reloaded with a new map -- though some things remain the same. The forest, dungeon and tower areas will be accessed according to their general locations -- East, South, and North respectively. Each area has a special boss enemy which isn't randomized either.

Outside the castle walls, you can buy upgrades and expand your heroes' manor using gold. Upgrades range from basic stats increases to unlockable classes. Additionally, you can employ help by purchasing a smith, enchantress, and architect. The smith will create new equipment, while the enchantress allows you to equip magical runes. These magical artifacts can be equipped in addition to armor and they alter your characters' abilities -- such as multiple air jumps, absorb HP/MP from kills, and even raising or lowering the enemy difficulty. The architect is unique such that he can "lock" the previous castles' layout so that the map doesn't change -- though this comes at only being able to collect gold at 70% its normal rate. This all means that there's a fairly deep level of customization to better prepare yourself for your next run.

There's also a good bit of humor thrown in -- much of it manifesting as unique genetic traits. For instance, one trait inverts the display forcing you to think upside-down as your character walks on the "ceiling." Other genetic oddities includes gigantism (makes you huge), dwarfism (makes you tiny) and dyslexia (obfuscates in-game text). It's played for laughs but many of the traits effect gameplay enough that you'll need to carefully read the character sheet. I found myself spec'ing towards a particular play style as Spellswords and Barbarians become my bread and butter.

Unfortunately, these pigeon-holes you into only picking a few of your favorite types but thankfully you can always upgrade abilities and stats with gold collected. Though, these get rather expensive as each new level increases by hundreds of gold. Likewise, the high concept of genetic legacy falls a bit short as the idea isn't as fleshed out as I would have liked. It could have been really neat if your stats upgraded through gameplay alone rather than devolving into a loot/grind fest. Still, it's polished and fun to play. There's even New Game + (and New Game ++) for the truly addicted players.

rogue-legacy-3
[Source]

The production of "Rogue Legacy" is pretty nice considering the price point. Art assets are sharp and animations are clean enough. The music is one the more charming points as each area of the castle harkens back to previous 8/16/32-bit platformers of yore. The more esoteric genetic traits have wonderful effects -- the nostalgic trait shows the game as filtered through an old timey film grain. Loading tips appear in the form of your kids' final words as they're forever immortalized in a family portrait. Also, depending on how well you performed with a particular child, they'll inherit certain titles such as Legendary -- granted upon defeating a boss -- or Useless -- given upon dying without killing anything. It's all cute and adorable and fits the somewhat lighthearted tone of the game.

Despite the grind fest and somewhat limited boss encounters, the art and charm of "Rogue Legacy" goes above and beyond. Tight controls, interesting RPG gimmick, and fun factor is well worth the time (and money) spent. Those that might be turned off from the devastatingly difficult rogue-likes will find a challenging but fun experience with nods to games long past.

"Rogue Legacy" is available now for $14.99 on PC.

"Rogue Legacy" score -- 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Oddworld' HD Remake Gets a Name, Fall 2013 Release Date
Hideo Kojima Looking for Studio to Remake the Original 'Metal Gear Solid'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , ,

‘Tiny Tina’s Assault on Dragon Keep’ DLC Review — A Natural 20

June 25th, 2013 No comments

tiny-tinas-assault-on-dragons-keep-1

The final DLC for the loot and shoot sequel has finally been released. While I've had my problems with past add-ons, there is something to be said with Gearbox's dedication to bring more and more of what fans love. Promising more of everything, this last quest thrusts your fearless vault hunter (and three friends) into a fantastical world of high adventure -- all wrapped up inside the mind of a disturbed child.

If you read my previous impressions, you'll know that this is a bit of a departure from the standard fare. Here's a quick recap -- Lilith, Brick, and Mordecai are coerced by Tiny Tina into a "Dungeons & Dragons" rip-off called "Bunkers & Baddassess" with Tina acting as the "Bunker Master." It's all very tongue in cheek and much of the humor derives from the old guard bemoaning this nerdy table top game. That's one half of the story, the other takes a more somber tone as Tiny Tina comes to terms with the death of a pal and learns to move on. Check out the beginning of the campaign in the video below and you'll get the gist of what to expect.

Of course, this all just a vehicle to get your character to an exotic location and murder everything in sight. Your quest takes you from the stony shores to a bustling village towards forests, mines, and ultimately the evil wizard's tower. In a neat twist, the events unfold in parallel to the vanilla mission to thwart Handsome Jack. It's a retelling of sorts wrapped in a slick, classic RPG skin.

Story aside, the gameplay is exactly as you would expect "Borderlands" to be -- you'll find hordes of creatures, loot their corpses, and then kill bigger, badder creatures for bigger, badder loot per nausea. The biggest change comes from the types of enemies. Orcs, skeletons, giant spiders, treants, knights, paladins, wizards and any number of other mythical creatures that would fit right at home airbrushed on the side of a 1970's van. Though a good deal of the bestiary is melee, many of the baddies have ranged attacks from magic missiles to fire arrows so you'll still find plenty of challenge. This being said, I found the latest Vault hunter -- Krieg -- to be especially fun given his focus beating the living crap out of anything that moves. Obviously, you don't need him to play but his style is perfect for the add-on missions.

The designs are what the real charm comes from in this DLC, with new details and textures and effects. Gearbox has really polished the season's worth of content and it really shows with their attention to detail. From dark, mystifying forests to thatched taverns, the "TTAODK" artists really knock it out of park with the visual treatment. It's as if the squad had stepped into their very own LARP and is just having a ball.

tiny-tinas-assault-on-dragons-keep-2

Missions a hodgepodge of the usual fare -- but more of the one off quick humor quests appear and add a lot of the comic relief. Speaking of which, this DLC probably has more dialogue in it than the other DLCs combined. Since the original cast is role playing, they often chime in with suggestions on how to proceed with the story. As a bonus, fans of table top gaming will be privy to the more esoteric puns and humor. Really, "TTAODK" is a swan song to fans of both genres and to the story of Tiny Tina as well.

Though the campaign is substantial and there are tons of side quests, my gripes about "Borderlands 2" still make an appearance. The monotonous, single-minded gameplay can wear thin at times and if you've already leveled up several characters there's not much more to do after the humor and wit have been spent. But with a few friends you'll find plenty to love about "Assault on Dragon's Keep."

'Tiny Tina's Assault On Dragon Keep' -- Score 4 out of 5

'Tiny Tina's Assault On Dragon Keep' is available for PC, PS3, and Xbox 360. It's included in the Season Pass but can be purchased separately for $9.99 or 800MSP.

Related Posts
Official: 'Hotline Miami' En Route to PlayStation Network for PS3 and Vita This Week, with Exclusive New Mask
Bethesda Talks 'Prey 2' and New 'Fallout' And Neither Are Coming Out Any Time Soon

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

‘Tiny Tina’s Assault on Dragon Keep’ DLC Review — A Natural 20

June 25th, 2013 No comments

tiny-tinas-assault-on-dragons-keep-1

The final DLC for the loot and shoot sequel has finally been released. While I've had my problems with past add-ons, there is something to be said with Gearbox's dedication to bring more and more of what fans love. Promising more of everything, this last quest thrusts your fearless vault hunter (and three friends) into a fantastical world of high adventure -- all wrapped up inside the mind of a disturbed child.

If you read my previous impressions, you'll know that this is a bit of a departure from the standard fare. Here's a quick recap -- Lilith, Brick, and Mordecai are coerced by Tiny Tina into a "Dungeons & Dragons" rip-off called "Bunkers & Baddassess" with Tina acting as the "Bunker Master." It's all very tongue in cheek and much of the humor derives from the old guard bemoaning this nerdy table top game. That's one half of the story, the other takes a more somber tone as Tiny Tina comes to terms with the death of a pal and learns to move on. Check out the beginning of the campaign in the video below and you'll get the gist of what to expect.

Of course, this all just a vehicle to get your character to an exotic location and murder everything in sight. Your quest takes you from the stony shores to a bustling village towards forests, mines, and ultimately the evil wizard's tower. In a neat twist, the events unfold in parallel to the vanilla mission to thwart Handsome Jack. It's a retelling of sorts wrapped in a slick, classic RPG skin.

Story aside, the gameplay is exactly as you would expect "Borderlands" to be -- you'll find hordes of creatures, loot their corpses, and then kill bigger, badder creatures for bigger, badder loot per nausea. The biggest change comes from the types of enemies. Orcs, skeletons, giant spiders, treants, knights, paladins, wizards and any number of other mythical creatures that would fit right at home airbrushed on the side of a 1970's van. Though a good deal of the bestiary is melee, many of the baddies have ranged attacks from magic missiles to fire arrows so you'll still find plenty of challenge. This being said, I found the latest Vault hunter -- Krieg -- to be especially fun given his focus beating the living crap out of anything that moves. Obviously, you don't need him to play but his style is perfect for the add-on missions.

The designs are what the real charm comes from in this DLC, with new details and textures and effects. Gearbox has really polished the season's worth of content and it really shows with their attention to detail. From dark, mystifying forests to thatched taverns, the "TTAODK" artists really knock it out of park with the visual treatment. It's as if the squad had stepped into their very own LARP and is just having a ball.

tiny-tinas-assault-on-dragons-keep-2

Missions a hodgepodge of the usual fare -- but more of the one off quick humor quests appear and add a lot of the comic relief. Speaking of which, this DLC probably has more dialogue in it than the other DLCs combined. Since the original cast is role playing, they often chime in with suggestions on how to proceed with the story. As a bonus, fans of table top gaming will be privy to the more esoteric puns and humor. Really, "TTAODK" is a swan song to fans of both genres and to the story of Tiny Tina as well.

Though the campaign is substantial and there are tons of side quests, my gripes about "Borderlands 2" still make an appearance. The monotonous, single-minded gameplay can wear thin at times and if you've already leveled up several characters there's not much more to do after the humor and wit have been spent. But with a few friends you'll find plenty to love about "Assault on Dragon's Keep."

'Tiny Tina's Assault On Dragon Keep' -- Score 4 out of 5

'Tiny Tina's Assault On Dragon Keep' is available for PC, PS3, and Xbox 360. It's included in the Season Pass but can be purchased separately for $9.99 or 800MSP.

Related Posts
Official: 'Hotline Miami' En Route to PlayStation Network for PS3 and Vita This Week, with Exclusive New Mask
Bethesda Talks 'Prey 2' and New 'Fallout' And Neither Are Coming Out Any Time Soon

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

‘Fuse’ Review (Xbox 360)

May 28th, 2013 No comments

fuse-2

Long time exclusive Sony developer, Insomniac Games has finally gone multiplatform wih a new third person, team tactical shooter. Originally under the project titled Overstrike, "Fuse" has been rebranded into a newish shooter that blends realistic firefights with bits of sci-fi tech. Fundamentally, it's a co-op experience, though you can play it by yourself. But it really comes down to is this -- if you're looking for another third person shooter, then this a game you can play.

I don't like being so negative about games like this because "Fuse" isn't a terrible game by any means. It's just terribly bland. The real problem is that this genre has been so saturated with same-y mechanics and attitudes, that when you see something that could genuinely have been unique and cool, it's a disappointment when it doesn't live up to your expectations.
It's doubly disappointing when this games comes from a developer with a strong pedigree for wierd and fun weapons with smart story telling and charming characters. Insomniac mades their name with the humorous, over-the-top "Ratchet & Clank" series that delivered a neat twist on platformer/shooters with bizarre weapons. With "Fuse" it seems that a lot of that imagination had been exhausted and replaced with generic cover-based shooting and mixed with odd traversal puzzle.

"Fuse" dumps you into a world of near future tech as a small PMC squad consisting of your basic shooter archetypes-- the grisled leader, Dalton; the heavy hitter, Jacob; the stealthy sniper, Naya; and the medic, Izzy. It doesn't break any new ground here but players will have a decent selection of characters to choose and you'll quickly figure out who you'll like playing. Each character has their specified role -- Dalton has a protective shield that provides protection for the team and boosts shots fired from its cover; Jacob uses a powerful  crossbow that can deal tremendous focused damage; Izzy can drop heal beacons to ressurect down-but-not-out allies and she has a gunt hat can freeze and shatter foes. Naya turned out to be my favorite as she had an impressive Xenotech weapon that proved to be especially devestating to groups -- you can tag baddies with its power and then focus one to create micro black hole that chains between everyone enemy that was tagged.  Additionally, she can become invisible to get you out of jams and take some of the heat off her.

fuse-3

In fact, I liked using her so much that I often just let the mostly, helpful AI run around doing their own thing. And that's kind of a problem --especially jumping in with co-op -- as I didn't want to play as anyone else. Also, since whatever character you choose levels up quicker -- each character has their own skill tree -- that my Naya was so much further leveled up that I was just used to rolling around with her powers.

You can swap between squadmates on the fly with the "LEAP" function. It works best in single player as you can just choose who you need to be whenever. But it also works well with two players since you can choose two mains and play digital musical chairs whenever you need. But with a full roster, you're locked into playing as only one of the four characters. Which kinda sucks because I figure that most people will want to play who the like best and if they don't get to be that character will just drop from the game.

The basic mechanics work well enough and the shooting feels rewarding -- ultimately, though, it's a shooting gallery with the occasional puzzle or boss fight. The story is pretty non-existent with most of it hidden within found collectables. This became somewhat humorous during one cutscene as I was completely unaware of a one of our squadmates previous love life and I was left wondering what the hell that dying speech was all about. Furthermore, the story is so typical and generic that I was fading in and out of between missions. Mostly the plot is just a loose skeleton of set pieces, taking you from underwater labs, to hidden palaces, and eventually into orbit.

Boss eccounters end up being some of the weaker parts of the game when put against some of the smaller, but more engaging, enemy firefights. These small scale shootouts provide some depth to the combat and really utilize each characters' specially ability. They sort of work out as combat puzzles that give your thumbs and spatial awareness a nice workout.

Padding out the content is Echelon Mode -- which brings co-op partners against wave after wave of increasingly tougher enemies. It's pretty bare bones when it comes to extras, but I had some fun with couch co-op as well as over XBL. The difficulty ramps pretty quickly and disorganized teams will tap out around the 5th or 6th wave. To help out, you can bring in your leveled characters from the campaign which should even the playing field for the first several rounds, though it's advised to have a maxed out team if you hope to make it to round 12.

fuse-1

Honestly, Echelon Mode is probably the best part of "Fuse" and it's a shame that it didn't have any more modes to experiment with. Insomniac did include some randomization by means of creating side objectives (like protecting an ammo drop) during some waves, but they don't dramatically alter the gameplay in any meaningful way, and even if you don't succeed you can still finish the round and move on. 

The biggest flaw with "Fuse" is that it lacks any sense of personality. So much so that the original, cartoony look could have been a fresh coat of paint in a world saturated with gritty, brown third-person shooters -- especially given the developer who has a great sense of charm with their projects. "Fuse" seems like a polished game from the barest of evaluation standards -- responsive controls (check), co-op (check), steady frame rate (check) -- but it lacks any passion. It's as if Insomniac just set out to "make a game" and they did just that.

3/5

"Fuse" is available now for PS3 and Xbox 360. Review copy provided by EA and reviewed on the Xbox 360.

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'Resident Evil: Revelations HD' Review (Wii U) -- Looking Into The Abyss
Art Attack: This Gallery of Animated Fighting Game Backgrounds is a Treat

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

‘Fuse’ Review (Xbox 360)

May 28th, 2013 No comments

fuse-2

Long time exclusive Sony developer, Insomniac Games has finally gone multiplatform with a new third person, team tactical shooter. Originally under the project titled Overstrike, "Fuse" has been re-branded into a newish shooter that blends realistic firefights with bits of sci-fi tech. Fundamentally, it's a co-op experience, though you can play it by yourself. But it really comes down to is this -- if you're looking for another third person shooter, then this a game you can play.

I don't like being so negative about games like this because "Fuse" isn't a terrible game by any means. It's just terribly bland. The real problem is that this genre has been so saturated with same-y mechanics and attitudes, that when you see something that could genuinely have been unique and cool, it's a disappointment when it doesn't live up to your expectations.
It's doubly disappointing when this games comes from a developer with a strong pedigree for weird and fun weapons with smart story telling and charming characters. Insomniac made their name with the humorous, over-the-top "Ratchet & Clank" series that delivered a neat twist on platformer/shooters with bizarre weapons. With "Fuse" it seems that a lot of that imagination had been exhausted and replaced with generic cover-based shooting and mixed with odd traversal puzzle.

"Fuse" dumps you into a world of near future tech as a small PMC squad consisting of your basic shooter archetypes-- the grizzled leader, Dalton; the heavy hitter, Jacob; the stealthy sniper, Naya; and the medic, Izzy. It doesn't break any new ground here but players will have a decent selection of characters to choose and you'll quickly figure out who you'll like playing. Each character has their specified role -- Dalton has a protective shield that provides protection for the team and boosts shots fired from its cover; Jacob uses a powerful  crossbow that can deal tremendous focused damage; Izzy can drop heal beacons to resurrect down-but-not-out allies and she has a gun that can freeze and shatter foes. Naya turned out to be my favorite as she had an impressive Xenotech weapon that proved to be especially devastating to groups -- you can tag baddies with its power and then focus one to create micro black hole that chains between everyone enemy that was tagged.  Additionally, she can become invisible to get you out of jams and take some of the heat off her.

fuse-3

In fact, I liked using her so much that I often just let the mostly, helpful AI run around doing their own thing. And that's kind of a problem --especially jumping in with co-op -- as I didn't want to play as anyone else. Also, since whatever character you choose levels up quicker -- each character has their own skill tree -- that my Naya was so much further leveled up that I was just used to rolling around with her powers.

You can swap between squad-mates on the fly with the "LEAP" function. It works best in single player as you can just choose who you need to be whenever. But it also works well with two players since you can choose two mains and play digital musical chairs whenever you need. But with a full roster, you're locked into playing as only one of the four characters. Which kinda sucks because I figure that most people will want to play who the like best and if they don't get to be that character will just drop from the game.

The basic mechanics work well enough and the shooting feels rewarding -- ultimately, though, it's a shooting gallery with the occasional puzzle or boss fight. The story is pretty non-existent with most of it hidden within found collectables. This became somewhat humorous during one cut-scene as I was completely unaware of a one of our squad-mates previous love life and I was left wondering what the hell that dying speech was all about. Furthermore, the story is so typical and generic that I was fading in and out of between missions. Mostly the plot is just a loose skeleton of set pieces, taking you from underwater labs, to hidden palaces, and eventually into orbit.

Boss encounters end up being some of the weaker parts of the game when put against some of the smaller, but more engaging, enemy firefights. These small scale shootouts provide some depth to the combat and really utilize each characters' specially ability. They sort of work out as combat puzzles that give your thumbs and spatial awareness a nice workout.

Padding out the content is Echelon Mode -- which brings co-op partners against wave after wave of increasingly tougher enemies. It's pretty bare bones when it comes to extras, but I had some fun with couch co-op as well as over XBL. The difficulty ramps pretty quickly and disorganized teams will tap out around the 5th or 6th wave. To help out, you can bring in your leveled characters from the campaign which should even the playing field for the first several rounds, though it's advised to have a maxed out team if you hope to make it to round 12.

fuse-1

Honestly, Echelon Mode is probably the best part of "Fuse" and it's a shame that it didn't have any more modes to experiment with. Insomniac did include some randomization by means of creating side objectives (like protecting an ammo drop) during some waves, but they don't dramatically alter the gameplay in any meaningful way, and even if you don't succeed you can still finish the round and move on.

The biggest flaw with "Fuse" is that it lacks any sense of personality. So much so that the original, cartoony look could have been a fresh coat of paint in a world saturated with gritty, brown third-person shooters -- especially given the developer who has a great sense of charm with their projects. "Fuse" seems like a polished game from the barest of evaluation standards -- responsive controls (check), co-op (check), steady frame rate (check) -- but it lacks any passion. It's as if Insomniac just set out to "make a game" and they did just that.

3/5

"Fuse" is available now for PS3 and Xbox 360. Review copy provided by EA and reviewed on the Xbox 360.

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Evilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town

May 27th, 2013 No comments

This is Portabliss, a column about downloadable games that can be played on the go.

Portabliss Evilot
Plants vs. Zombies has long been one of the most popular titles on the App Store (or any platform it's been released on, really), but PopCap has only recently revealed a sequel set to arrive in another month or so. In all that time, then, it's not surprising that game developers have "borrowed" PopCap's casual tower defense formula, where you build up units in lanes to defend against an oncoming horde. Samurai Bloodshow is one of the best pretenders to the throne, and there are other games like Legendary Wars that took PopCap's premise and ran far with it.

Evilot also belongs in the second category. It's a recently released iPad game that has a very clear resemblance to the longtime battle of flowers against the undead, in that enemy troops come in by lanes from the right, and you need to build up units to defend treasure on the left. But while Plants vs. Zombies uses a straightforward currency system to build up its units, Evilot borrows a core mechanic from another great iOS title: Triple Town.

Continue reading Evilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town

JoystiqEvilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 27 May 2013 11:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Evilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town

May 27th, 2013 No comments

This is Portabliss, a column about downloadable games that can be played on the go.

Portabliss Evilot
Plants vs. Zombies has long been one of the most popular titles on the App Store (or any platform it's been released on, really), but PopCap has only recently revealed a sequel set to arrive in another month or so. In all that time, then, it's not surprising that game developers have "borrowed" PopCap's casual tower defense formula, where you build up units in lanes to defend against an oncoming horde. Samurai Bloodshow is one of the best pretenders to the throne, and there are other games like Legendary Wars that took PopCap's premise and ran far with it.

Evilot also belongs in the second category. It's a recently released iPad game that has a very clear resemblance to the longtime battle of flowers against the undead, in that enemy troops come in by lanes from the right, and you need to build up units to defend treasure on the left. But while Plants vs. Zombies uses a straightforward currency system to build up its units, Evilot borrows a core mechanic from another great iOS title: Triple Town.

Continue reading Evilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town

JoystiqEvilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 27 May 2013 11:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Evilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town

May 27th, 2013 No comments

This is Portabliss, a column about downloadable games that can be played on the go.

Portabliss Evilot
Plants vs. Zombies has long been one of the most popular titles on the App Store (or any platform it's been released on, really), but PopCap has only recently revealed a sequel set to arrive in another month or so. In all that time, then, it's not surprising that game developers have "borrowed" PopCap's casual tower defense formula, where you build up units in lanes to defend against an oncoming horde. Samurai Bloodshow is one of the best pretenders to the throne, and there are other games like Legendary Wars that took PopCap's premise and ran far with it.

Evilot also belongs in the second category. It's a recently released iPad game that has a very clear resemblance to the longtime battle of flowers against the undead, in that enemy troops come in by lanes from the right, and you need to build up units to defend treasure on the left. But while Plants vs. Zombies uses a straightforward currency system to build up its units, Evilot borrows a core mechanic from another great iOS title: Triple Town.

Continue reading Evilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town

JoystiqEvilot takes Plants vs. Zombies to Triple Town originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 27 May 2013 11:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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