_gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageLoadTime']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘NEWS’

Old School, Flight School: ‘Strike Vector’ Is Your Shiny New Dogfighting Mech Game

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

I was pretty enamored with "EVR," the Oculus Rift space-dogfighting game by CCP, when I played it earlier this year. The decline of the flight sim genre has been well-documented, and it's not often enough that people get to suit up, strap in, and blow each other up into teensy-tiny smithereens.

Alas, there's no release date in sight for the Oculus Rift. What's a boy to do? Enter "Strike Vector."

The skinny: "Strike Vector" is a multiplayer arena combat game made in ten months by the four people at the appropriately-named Team Strike using Unreal Engine 3.

In a word, the game looks good, its floating oil rigs and slumtowns dense and detailed. There's some sort of dystopian backstory about mercenary fighter pilots working for mega-corporations, but the important thing is being able to swoop in and out of post-industrial nooks and crannies in search of people to explode.

Here's the hook: each Vector -- i.e., ship -- can be flown in either "jet mode" or "hover mode." Jet mode is self-explanatory: zoom around, shoot missiles, make Top Gun jokes. In hover mode, however, "Strike Vector" plays more like a first-person mech-style game: you can strafe, turn in 360 degrees, and use ironsights.

Destructible environments and customizable ships round out "Strike Vector"'s list of features, the sum of which seem designed to provide plenty of variables to make each match dynamic, or at least new-feeling. There's more information on the game's official site.

So, to recap: "Yes" to dogfighting games, "yes" to impressive efforts from tiny indie studios, "yes" to finding a new term besides "dogfight" to describe videogames about airplane combat. I'm always afraid people are going to think that there are games out there about actual illegal dog fighting. Spaceships and lasers are way better.

"Strike Vector" probably won't be ready until 2014, but until then, there's a Steam Greenlight page.

[Steam Greenlight]

Related Posts
I Wonder Why CCP Brought Their Oculus Rift Dogfighting Game 'EVR' to E3
Vlambeer Officially Announces Stylish Figther Pilot Game 'Luftrausers' for Vita and PS3

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Old School, Flight School: ‘Strike Vector’ Is Your Shiny New Dogfighting Mech Game

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

I was pretty enamored with "EVR," the Oculus Rift space-dogfighting game by CCP, when I played it earlier this year. The decline of the flight sim genre has been well-documented, and it's not often enough that people get to suit up, strap in, and blow each other up into teensy-tiny smithereens.

Alas, there's no release date in sight for the Oculus Rift. What's a boy to do? Enter "Strike Vector."

The skinny: "Strike Vector" is a multiplayer arena combat game made in ten months by the four people at the appropriately-named Team Strike using Unreal Engine 3.

In a word, the game looks good, its floating oil rigs and slumtowns dense and detailed. There's some sort of dystopian backstory about mercenary fighter pilots working for mega-corporations, but the important thing is being able to swoop in and out of post-industrial nooks and crannies in search of people to explode.

Here's the hook: each Vector -- i.e., ship -- can be flown in either "jet mode" or "hover mode." Jet mode is self-explanatory: zoom around, shoot missiles, make Top Gun jokes. In hover mode, however, "Strike Vector" plays more like a first-person mech-style game: you can strafe, turn in 360 degrees, and use ironsights.

Destructible environments and customizable ships round out "Strike Vector"'s list of features, the sum of which seem designed to provide plenty of variables to make each match dynamic, or at least new-feeling. There's more information on the game's official site.

So, to recap: "Yes" to dogfighting games, "yes" to impressive efforts from tiny indie studios, "yes" to finding a new term besides "dogfight" to describe videogames about airplane combat. I'm always afraid people are going to think that there are games out there about actual illegal dog fighting. Spaceships and lasers are way better.

"Strike Vector" probably won't be ready until 2014, but until then, there's a Steam Greenlight page.

[Steam Greenlight]

Related Posts
I Wonder Why CCP Brought Their Oculus Rift Dogfighting Game 'EVR' to E3
Vlambeer Officially Announces Stylish Figther Pilot Game 'Luftrausers' for Vita and PS3

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , ,

Old School, Flight School: ‘Strike Vector’ Is Your Shiny New Dogfighting Mech Game

July 1st, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

I was pretty enamored with "EVR," the Oculus Rift space-dogfighting game by CCP, when I played it earlier this year. The decline of the flight sim genre has been well-documented, and it's not often enough that people get to suit up, strap in, and blow each other up into teensy-tiny smithereens.

Alas, there's no release date in sight for the Oculus Rift. What's a boy to do? Enter "Strike Vector."

The skinny: "Strike Vector" is a multiplayer arena combat game made in ten months by the four people at the appropriately-named Team Strike using Unreal Engine 3.

In a word, the game looks good, its floating oil rigs and slumtowns dense and detailed. There's some sort of dystopian backstory about mercenary fighter pilots working for mega-corporations, but the important thing is being able to swoop in and out of post-industrial nooks and crannies in search of people to explode.

Here's the hook: each Vector -- i.e., ship -- can be flown in either "jet mode" or "hover mode." Jet mode is self-explanatory: zoom around, shoot missiles, make Top Gun jokes. In hover mode, however, "Strike Vector" plays more like a first-person mech-style game: you can strafe, turn in 360 degrees, and use ironsights.

Destructible environments and customizable ships round out "Strike Vector"'s list of features, the sum of which seem designed to provide plenty of variables to make each match dynamic, or at least new-feeling. There's more information on the game's official site.

So, to recap: "Yes" to dogfighting games, "yes" to impressive efforts from tiny indie studios, "yes" to finding a new term besides "dogfight" to describe videogames about airplane combat. I'm always afraid people are going to think that there are games out there about actual illegal dog fighting. Spaceships and lasers are way better.

"Strike Vector" probably won't be ready until 2014, but until then, there's a Steam Greenlight page.

[Steam Greenlight]

Related Posts
I Wonder Why CCP Brought Their Oculus Rift Dogfighting Game 'EVR' to E3
Vlambeer Officially Announces Stylish Figther Pilot Game 'Luftrausers' for Vita and PS3

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Microsoft No Longer Charging for Patches to Xbox Live Arcade Games

June 28th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

Raz (Psychonauts)

In a statement to Eurogamer, Microsoft has confirmed that it will no longer charge developers to patch their Xbox Live Arcade games. "Microsoft eliminated fees to Title Updates on Xbox 360 Arcade games in April 2013," explained a Microsoft spokesperson. "We're constantly evaluating our policies and implementing feedback.

"While our development policies are confidential, and will remain so, we're pleased to say that this is just one of many ongoing changes and improvements we've made to ensure Xbox is the best place possible for developers and gamers."

Since the launch of the Xbox 360 in 2006, Microsoft's policy had been to allow developers to patch their games once for free and then charge for any subsequent updates. The Redmond party line has been, until now, that its policies encourage thorough quality assurance from developers.

"Fez" developer Phil Fish (in)famously pegged the cost of an Xbox Live patch at "tens of thousands of dollars," while Double Fine head Tim Schafer pinpoints the figure at $40,000 in an interview last year with Hookshot. Both studios have been explicit about certification costs as a reason to move away from the Xbox platform: "Fez 2" won't be coming to the Xbox One, and Double Fine have moved to Kickstarter as a consistent source of funding.

Microsoft's official statement and  confirmation of the policy change come only after several sources in the development community discussed it with Eurogamer. According to that report, Microsoft's new policy includes retail games as well, though the company's statement only refers explicitly to Xbox Live Arcade titles.

Also according to Eurogamer, Microsoft still reserves the right to charge for title updates and re-certification if it deems a developers submissions "excessive."

One thing I don't understand is why Microsoft are course-correcting now, seven years into the life of the Xbox 360 and only a few months away from the release of the Xbox One. The whole thing seems a day late and a dollar short, not to mention that the switch was flipped in April and never publicized it.

What does the policy change mean for audiences, though? Hopefully, that Xbox Live Arcade development is a little cost prohibitive for small studios, and that patchable issues can be solved quickly and more effectively moving forward.  Meanwhile, there's no word on how this policy change will affect the Xbox One, but it does little to change the fact that studios still aren't allowed to self-published on either Xbox.

[Eurogamer]

Related Posts
Free Games on Xbox Live Set for 1st and 16th of Every Month
Xbox One-Eighty -- Microsoft Acquiesces on 'Always On'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , ,

Microsoft No Longer Charging for Patches to Xbox Live Arcade Games

June 28th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

Raz (Psychonauts)

In a statement to Eurogamer, Microsoft has confirmed that it will no longer charge developers to patch their Xbox Live Arcade games. "Microsoft eliminated fees to Title Updates on Xbox 360 Arcade games in April 2013," explained a Microsoft spokesperson. "We're constantly evaluating our policies and implementing feedback.

"While our development policies are confidential, and will remain so, we're pleased to say that this is just one of many ongoing changes and improvements we've made to ensure Xbox is the best place possible for developers and gamers."

Since the launch of the Xbox 360 in 2006, Microsoft's policy had been to allow developers to patch their games once for free and then charge for any subsequent updates. The Redmond party line has been, until now, that its policies encourage thorough quality assurance from developers.

"Fez" developer Phil Fish (in)famously pegged the cost of an Xbox Live patch at "tens of thousands of dollars," while Double Fine head Tim Schafer pinpoints the figure at $40,000 in an interview last year with Hookshot. Both studios have been explicit about certification costs as a reason to move away from the Xbox platform: "Fez 2" won't be coming to the Xbox One, and Double Fine have moved to Kickstarter as a consistent source of funding.

Microsoft's official statement and  confirmation of the policy change come only after several sources in the development community discussed it with Eurogamer. According to that report, Microsoft's new policy includes retail games as well, though the company's statement only refers explicitly to Xbox Live Arcade titles.

Also according to Eurogamer, Microsoft still reserves the right to charge for title updates and re-certification if it deems a developers submissions "excessive."

One thing I don't understand is why Microsoft are course-correcting now, seven years into the life of the Xbox 360 and only a few months away from the release of the Xbox One. The whole thing seems a day late and a dollar short, not to mention that the switch was flipped in April and never publicized it.

What does the policy change mean for audiences, though? Hopefully, that Xbox Live Arcade development is a little cost prohibitive for small studios, and that patchable issues can be solved quickly and more effectively moving forward.  Meanwhile, there's no word on how this policy change will affect the Xbox One, but it does little to change the fact that studios still aren't allowed to self-published on either Xbox.

[Eurogamer]

Related Posts
Free Games on Xbox Live Set for 1st and 16th of Every Month
Xbox One-Eighty -- Microsoft Acquiesces on 'Always On'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , ,

Strong Finish: ‘A Hat in Time’ Meets All Kickstarter Stretch Goals as Fundraising Winds Down

June 27th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

A Hat in Time

We haven't covered Gears for Breakfast's cel-shaded 3D adventure game "A Hat in Time" yet, but I suspect that's going to change soon: the Copenhagen-based developer has successfully Kicstarted the projected, met all of its stretch goals, and are in talks with Nintendo for a Wii U port.

Gears for Breakfast initially asked for a modest $30,000 to finish development on the game, but Kickstarter donations have -- 24 hours before the campaign closes -- breached $260,000, enough to fund all of the game's stretch goals. These include: developer commentary, co-op, two new chapters, full voice acting, a spaceship hub, a New Game+ mode, and extra music from composer Grant Kirkhope (of "Banjo-Kazooie" fame).

The multi-national dev has also promised one new Kirkhope track for every $15,000 raised about $200,000, which also allow the team to include more enemies, more special attack abilities, and extra NPCs to populate "A Hate in Time"'s colorful world. The campaign ends tomorrow, June 28th, and the game is set for release on Mac and PC next February.

The elevator pitch is simple: "A Hat in Time" combines the time shifting of "Majora's Mask" and the aesthetic of "Wind Waker" and ties them to the 3D action-adventure motifs that flourished -- and then quickly died out -- during the days of the Nintendo 64. The result is -- at first glance -- a lot of collecting, exploring, platforming, and ground-pounding.

Given the obvious and explicit  inspiration from old Rare and Nintendo series, it's no surprise that Gears for Breakfast would try to port the game to Wii U.

If you're feeling nostalgic, you can find tons of more information on the game's Kickstarter and Steam Greenlight pages.

[Kickstarter via Eurogamer]

Related Posts
'New Super Luigi U' Review - The Green Guy Gets His Due
'Rayman Legends' Delay Caused by Wii U Sales Concerns, says Ubisoft CEO

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Strong Finish: ‘A Hat in Time’ Meets All Kickstarter Stretch Goals as Fundraising Winds Down

June 27th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

A Hat in Time

We haven't covered Gears for Breakfast's cel-shaded 3D adventure game "A Hat in Time" yet, but I suspect that's going to change soon: the Copenhagen-based developer has successfully Kicstarted the projected, met all of its stretch goals, and are in talks with Nintendo for a Wii U port.

Gears for Breakfast initially asked for a modest $30,000 to finish development on the game, but Kickstarter donations have -- 24 hours before the campaign closes -- breached $260,000, enough to fund all of the game's stretch goals. These include: developer commentary, co-op, two new chapters, full voice acting, a spaceship hub, a New Game+ mode, and extra music from composer Grant Kirkhope (of "Banjo-Kazooie" fame).

The multi-national dev has also promised one new Kirkhope track for every $15,000 raised about $200,000, which also allow the team to include more enemies, more special attack abilities, and extra NPCs to populate "A Hate in Time"'s colorful world. The campaign ends tomorrow, June 28th, and the game is set for release on Mac and PC next February.

The elevator pitch is simple: "A Hat in Time" combines the time shifting of "Majora's Mask" and the aesthetic of "Wind Waker" and ties them to the 3D action-adventure motifs that flourished -- and then quickly died out -- during the days of the Nintendo 64. The result is -- at first glance -- a lot of collecting, exploring, platforming, and ground-pounding.

Given the obvious and explicit  inspiration from old Rare and Nintendo series, it's no surprise that Gears for Breakfast would try to port the game to Wii U.

If you're feeling nostalgic, you can find tons of more information on the game's Kickstarter and Steam Greenlight pages.

[Kickstarter via Eurogamer]

Related Posts
'New Super Luigi U' Review - The Green Guy Gets His Due
'Rayman Legends' Delay Caused by Wii U Sales Concerns, says Ubisoft CEO

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

‘Oddworld: New ‘n’ Tasty’ Devs Want to Tackle a ‘Metal Gear Solid’ Remake

June 27th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee

Just Add Water, the British studio developing a handful of Oddworld Inhabitants projects, are the first studio to publicly throw their names into Hideo Kojima's hat following yesterday's news that he was actively seeking third-party developers to remake "Metal Gear Solid" using the Fox Engine.

Kojima explained that parts of "Metal Gear Solid" would need to be updated and modernized, especially since he would want the hypothetical project to use Kojima Productions' proprietary Fox Engine. What's funny is that this is, uh, pretty much exactly what Just Add Water are doing to "Oddworld: Abe's Odyssey."

Here's the bulk of their open letter to Kojima:

We at Just Add Water feel ideally positioned to do the remake justice for several reasons:

  1. We have experience working with legendary IP (Oddworld Inhabitants) and treating the subject matter with the respect it deserves.
  2. Many members of our team are huge 'Metal Gear' fans, with very good knowledge of the source material.
  3. We really, really want to do it.

If "we really, really want to" isn't reason enough -- and, honestly, it should be -- Just Add Water aren't exactly neophytes of the video game remastering industry. They built the HD remake of "Oddworld: Stranger's Wrath" -- originally an Xbox title -- for PC, PlayStation 3, and Vita and, as of E3 2013, are working on a Wii U version as well.

"Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty" is a more ambitious project: a complete do-over, from the ground up, of Oddworld Inhabitants' seminal "Abe's Odyssee," the 1997 PlayStation game that launched the entire series. "New 'n' Tasty" is being developed in Unity's 3D engine as a 2D side-scrolling platformer, using the original as a "blueprint," while introducing quick saves and some user-friendly puzzle modifications.

Ok, so "Metal Gear Solid" is a simultaneously gritty and surrealist version of Cold War spy-vs.-spy (with some cloning thrown in for good measure) and "Oddworld" is a gruesome, dark fantasy story about slavery, ecological preservation, and a seriously deficient FDA -- seriously, the Glukkons are packaging the Mudokons as food. But the two projects aren't as disparate as they seem.

While the "Oddworld" series eventually shifted toward first-person shooting in "Stranger's Wrath," "Abe's Oddyssee" focused heavily on stealth, lateral thinking, and puzzle solving. In that sense, Just Add Water's experience with "Oddworld" could serve them well if they were ever tapped for this mythical "Metal Gear Solid" remake.

"Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty" (which I'm seriously looking forward to) is slated for this Fall on PlayStation 3, 4, and Vita, as well as Mac, PC, and Linux. The game is also concept approved, according to Oddoworld Inhabitants, for Microsoft consoles if they can find a retail publisher to partner with.

[Just Add Water]

Related Posts
'Oddworld' HD Remake Gets a Name, Fall 2013 Release Date
Hideo Kojima Looking for Studio to Remake the Original 'Metal Gear Solid'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

‘Oddworld: New ‘n’ Tasty’ Devs Want to Tackle a ‘Metal Gear Solid’ Remake

June 27th, 2013 No comments

by Joseph Leray

Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee

Just Add Water, the British studio developing a handful of Oddworld Inhabitants projects, are the first studio to publicly throw their names into Hideo Kojima's hat following yesterday's news that he was actively seeking third-party developers to remake "Metal Gear Solid" using the Fox Engine.

Kojima explained that parts of "Metal Gear Solid" would need to be updated and modernized, especially since he would want the hypothetical project to use Kojima Productions' proprietary Fox Engine. What's funny is that this is, uh, pretty much exactly what Just Add Water are doing to "Oddworld: Abe's Odyssey."

Here's the bulk of their open letter to Kojima:

We at Just Add Water feel ideally positioned to do the remake justice for several reasons:

  1. We have experience working with legendary IP (Oddworld Inhabitants) and treating the subject matter with the respect it deserves.
  2. Many members of our team are huge 'Metal Gear' fans, with very good knowledge of the source material.
  3. We really, really want to do it.

If "we really, really want to" isn't reason enough -- and, honestly, it should be -- Just Add Water aren't exactly neophytes of the video game remastering industry. They built the HD remake of "Oddworld: Stranger's Wrath" -- originally an Xbox title -- for PC, PlayStation 3, and Vita and, as of E3 2013, are working on a Wii U version as well.

"Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty" is a more ambitious project: a complete do-over, from the ground up, of Oddworld Inhabitants' seminal "Abe's Odyssee," the 1997 PlayStation game that launched the entire series. "New 'n' Tasty" is being developed in Unity's 3D engine as a 2D side-scrolling platformer, using the original as a "blueprint," while introducing quick saves and some user-friendly puzzle modifications.

Ok, so "Metal Gear Solid" is a simultaneously gritty and surrealist version of Cold War spy-vs.-spy (with some cloning thrown in for good measure) and "Oddworld" is a gruesome, dark fantasy story about slavery, ecological preservation, and a seriously deficient FDA -- seriously, the Glukkons are packaging the Mudokons as food. But the two projects aren't as disparate as they seem.

While the "Oddworld" series eventually shifted toward first-person shooting in "Stranger's Wrath," "Abe's Oddyssee" focused heavily on stealth, lateral thinking, and puzzle solving. In that sense, Just Add Water's experience with "Oddworld" could serve them well if they were ever tapped for this mythical "Metal Gear Solid" remake.

"Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty" (which I'm seriously looking forward to) is slated for this Fall on PlayStation 3, 4, and Vita, as well as Mac, PC, and Linux. The game is also concept approved, according to Oddoworld Inhabitants, for Microsoft consoles if they can find a retail publisher to partner with.

[Just Add Water]

Related Posts
'Oddworld' HD Remake Gets a Name, Fall 2013 Release Date
Hideo Kojima Looking for Studio to Remake the Original 'Metal Gear Solid'

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Joseph Leray is a freelance writer from Nashville. Follow him on Twitter

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Enrollment still open at Monster Hunter Community College 2

June 27th, 2013 No comments

By Miguel Concepcion
Screen Shot 2013-06-27 at 2.51.23 PMFor as much as the 'Monster Hunter' franchise looks and feels like your typical action-driven multiplayer online game, Capcom's U.S. publishing side is very cognizant of the series' often under-appreciated combat depth. Even as far back as 2009, Capcom's held 'Monster Hunter' community events scholastically themed on further 'Monster Hunter' education. Their latest one happens to be this Saturday, June 29, which also happens to be at Capcom's U.S. office in San Mateo, California, less than 30 minutes away from San Francisco (in good traffic).

Running from 11AM to 5PM, Capcom has ensured that Monster Hunter Community College 2 will be a multi-event gathering, as they're determined to top their previous one. In-house and community experts will offer gameplay tips if you're just a beginner, exclusive 'Monster Hunter' items will be on sale, and there'll have a live-streamed Extra Credit tournament open to all attendees. Note: this event is a Bring Your Own Console gathering, so bring either your 3DS or your Wii U.  Whichever you bring, your attendance guarantees early access to two early DLC Event Quests for the 3DS!

Capcom notified us that there is still time to enroll, so if you're interested, follow this LINK.

Oh, and you can also have your photo taken with a life-size Rathalos Firesword and the Dios Slicers, as pictured here by Capcom's Yuri Lindbergh (left) and Brett Elston (Photo by Capcom).

Screen Shot 2013-06-27 at 2.58.24 PM

Related Posts
‘Dreamfall Chapters’ Rakes in a Milli, Releases New Footage of Europolis
'Dear Esther' Dev Staffing Up for Next-Gen Console Game

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , ,

GameSpasm is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache