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Posts Tagged ‘Media’

TechMediaNetwork beefs up with acquisition of Tom’s Hardware parent

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

TechMedia Network, the parent company of Laptop Magazine and Space.com, just added another hot techie vertical to its portfolio: Tom’s Hardware.

TMN announced today that it had acquired Bestofmedia Group (BOM), the parent company of Tom’s Hardware, Tom’s IT Pro, and Tom’s Guide. Tom’s Hardware is an uber-gadget-geek’s gadget geek site, with extremely detailed, low-level reviews of computer hardware. It may be difficult going for non-geeks, but for those who need to know which motherboard has the best performance or what the exact differences are between Intel’s Core i7-4960X and Intel’s LGA-1155 Ivy Bridge chips, Tom’s has built up trust over more than a decade of reviews and analysis. More recently, it boasted that its unique visitors count has grown 85 percent in 10 months, with more than 3 million “active users,” although it didn’t define the exact size of its monthly audience or what it meant by active users.

The combination makes TechMedia Network the third-largest publisher of technology news online, after CNET. It claims that it will reach 72 million people every month after the acquisition.

The company didn’t specify the terms of the acquisition, but a spokesperson stated that it was a majority stock transaction, meaning it’s more like a merger than an outright acquisition.

Greg Mason, CEO of Techmedia Group
TechMedia Group

Greg Mason, CEO of Techmedia Group

“The Bestofmedia Group investors are wholly invested in the value that we think we can create with the combined businesses in the next couple of years. This was not an asset sale,” said TMN chief executive Greg Mason.

What’s more, we’re hearing that TMN is quite profitable, thanks to its ability to incorporate e-commerce into its site in addition to the advertising revenues that are most media companies’ bread and butter.

TMN took a $33 million Series B investment in 2011, from ABS Capital Partners, Village Ventures, and Highway 12 Ventures. It is based in New York.

BOM, founded in 2000, is based in Paris. It last took a $35 million round led by Index Ventures in 2008.


Filed under: Deals, Media
    


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TechMediaNetwork beefs up with acquisition of Tom’s Hardware parent

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

TechMedia Network, the parent company of Laptop Magazine and Space.com, just added another hot techie vertical to its portfolio: Tom’s Hardware.

TMN announced today that it had acquired Bestofmedia Group (BOM), the parent company of Tom’s Hardware, Tom’s IT Pro, and Tom’s Guide. Tom’s Hardware is an uber-gadget-geek’s gadget geek site, with extremely detailed, low-level reviews of computer hardware. It may be difficult going for non-geeks, but for those who need to know which motherboard has the best performance or what the exact differences are between Intel’s Core i7-4960X and Intel’s LGA-1155 Ivy Bridge chips, Tom’s has built up trust over more than a decade of reviews and analysis. More recently, it boasted that its unique visitors count has grown 85 percent in 10 months, with more than 3 million “active users,” although it didn’t define the exact size of its monthly audience or what it meant by active users.

The combination makes TechMedia Network the third-largest publisher of technology news online, after CNET. It claims that it will reach 72 million people every month after the acquisition.

The company didn’t specify the terms of the acquisition, but a spokesperson stated that it was a majority stock transaction, meaning it’s more like a merger than an outright acquisition.

Greg Mason, CEO of Techmedia Group
TechMedia Group

Greg Mason, CEO of Techmedia Group

“The Bestofmedia Group investors are wholly invested in the value that we think we can create with the combined businesses in the next couple of years. This was not an asset sale,” said TMN chief executive Greg Mason.

What’s more, we’re hearing that TMN is quite profitable, thanks to its ability to incorporate e-commerce into its site in addition to the advertising revenues that are most media companies’ bread and butter.

TMN took a $33 million Series B investment in 2011, from ABS Capital Partners, Village Ventures, and Highway 12 Ventures. It is based in New York.

BOM, founded in 2000, is based in Paris. It last took a $35 million round led by Index Ventures in 2008.


Filed under: Deals, Media
    


Tags: , , , ,

TechMediaNetwork beefs up with acquisition of Tom’s Hardware parent

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

TechMedia Network, the parent company of Laptop Magazine and Space.com, just added another hot techie vertical to its portfolio: Tom’s Hardware.

TMN announced today that it had acquired Bestofmedia Group (BOM), the parent company of Tom’s Hardware, Tom’s IT Pro, and Tom’s Guide. Tom’s Hardware is an uber-gadget-geek’s gadget geek site, with extremely detailed, low-level reviews of computer hardware. It may be difficult going for non-geeks, but for those who need to know which motherboard has the best performance or what the exact differences are between Intel’s Core i7-4960X and Intel’s LGA-1155 Ivy Bridge chips, Tom’s has built up trust over more than a decade of reviews and analysis. More recently, it boasted that its unique visitors count has grown 85 percent in 10 months, with more than 3 million “active users,” although it didn’t define the exact size of its monthly audience or what it meant by active users.

The combination makes TechMedia Network the third-largest publisher of technology news online, after CNET. It claims that it will reach 72 million people every month after the acquisition.

The company didn’t specify the terms of the acquisition, but a spokesperson stated that it was a majority stock transaction, meaning it’s more like a merger than an outright acquisition.

Greg Mason, CEO of Techmedia Group
TechMedia Group

Greg Mason, CEO of Techmedia Group

“The Bestofmedia Group investors are wholly invested in the value that we think we can create with the combined businesses in the next couple of years. This was not an asset sale,” said TMN chief executive Greg Mason.

What’s more, we’re hearing that TMN is quite profitable, thanks to its ability to incorporate e-commerce into its site in addition to the advertising revenues that are most media companies’ bread and butter.

TMN took a $33 million Series B investment in 2011, from ABS Capital Partners, Village Ventures, and Highway 12 Ventures. It is based in New York.

BOM, founded in 2000, is based in Paris. It last took a $35 million round led by Index Ventures in 2008.


Filed under: Deals, Media
    


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ComiXology rolls out digital comic subscriptions & bundles

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Comixology subscriptions

Digital comic book startup ComiXology is now offering its customers the ability to subscribe to monthly and bi-weekly comic series through its website, the company announced today.

With subscriptions, customers will have their credit cards charged every time a new issue of a particular comic series goes on sale. But those sales are routed through ComiXology’s website — not Apple’s Apple Store or Google Play. That means the company won’t have to pay the 30 percent commission fee for anything sold on either of those two platforms. And since ComiXology is consistently among the highest grossing iPad apps, this is definitely a big deal in terms of their business.

The subscribed comics purchased on the website will appear across all of ComiXology’s apps, which customers will then need to download to read. You can manage those subscriptions from the website, deleting or adding more based on your financial situation or interest in the comic series.

This also has the added advantage of lessening the blow back from customers when Apple decides one of the comic for sale in ComiXology’s store goes against its own policies, which has happened a handful of times in the past. The most recent instance was back in May, when the company had to remove a handful of comics due to sexual or satanic content.


Related: Too sexy for iOS: Apple directs ComiXology to yank 56 comics about sex, Satan, & gay heroes


comixology mobileWhile the new subscriptions don’t offer any kind of discount on the books you purchase, the company is also offering new bundles of different comics that will be.

In addition to the subscriptions and bundles, the company has been quite busy sprucing up other parts of its business and comic reader service. Earlier this year it announced plans to add content from other countries across Europe, and even set up a new international office in France. More recently, the company rolled out new reader enhancements like being able to automatically fit comic pages to a device’s orientation and a new two-page view.

(Note:  If you’re curious about how to scale mobile experiences across multiple platforms like ComiXology is doing, check out VentureBeat’s MobileBeat 2013 conference July 9-10. )


Filed under: Media, Mobile Tags: , , , ,

ComiXology rolls out digital comic subscriptions & bundles

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Comixology subscriptions

Digital comic book startup ComiXology is now offering its customers the ability to subscribe to monthly and bi-weekly comic series through its website, the company announced today.

With subscriptions, customers will have their credit cards charged every time a new issue of a particular comic series goes on sale. But those sales are routed through ComiXology’s website — not Apple’s Apple Store or Google Play. That means the company won’t have to pay the 30 percent commission fee for anything sold on either of those two platforms. And since ComiXology is consistently among the highest grossing iPad apps, this is definitely a big deal in terms of their business.

The subscribed comics purchased on the website will appear across all of ComiXology’s apps, which customers will then need to download to read. You can manage those subscriptions from the website, deleting or adding more based on your financial situation or interest in the comic series.

This also has the added advantage of lessening the blow back from customers when Apple decides one of the comic for sale in ComiXology’s store goes against its own policies, which has happened a handful of times in the past. The most recent instance was back in May, when the company had to remove a handful of comics due to sexual or satanic content.


Related: Too sexy for iOS: Apple directs ComiXology to yank 56 comics about sex, Satan, & gay heroes


comixology mobileWhile the new subscriptions don’t offer any kind of discount on the books you purchase, the company is also offering new bundles of different comics that will be.

In addition to the subscriptions and bundles, the company has been quite busy sprucing up other parts of its business and comic reader service. Earlier this year it announced plans to add content from other countries across Europe, and even set up a new international office in France. More recently, the company rolled out new reader enhancements like being able to automatically fit comic pages to a device’s orientation and a new two-page view.

(Note:  If you’re curious about how to scale mobile experiences across multiple platforms like ComiXology is doing, check out VentureBeat’s MobileBeat 2013 conference July 9-10. )


Filed under: Media, Mobile Tags: , , , ,

ComiXology rolls out digital comic subscriptions & bundles

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Comixology subscriptions

Digital comic book startup ComiXology is now offering its customers the ability to subscribe to monthly and bi-weekly comic series through its website, the company announced today.

With subscriptions, customers will have their credit cards charged every time a new issue of a particular comic series goes on sale. But those sales are routed through ComiXology’s website — not Apple’s Apple Store or Google Play. That means the company won’t have to pay the 30 percent commission fee for anything sold on either of those two platforms. And since ComiXology is consistently among the highest grossing iPad apps, this is definitely a big deal in terms of their business.

The subscribed comics purchased on the website will appear across all of ComiXology’s apps, which customers will then need to download to read. You can manage those subscriptions from the website, deleting or adding more based on your financial situation or interest in the comic series.

This also has the added advantage of lessening the blow back from customers when Apple decides one of the comic for sale in ComiXology’s store goes against its own policies, which has happened a handful of times in the past. The most recent instance was back in May, when the company had to remove a handful of comics due to sexual or satanic content.


Related: Too sexy for iOS: Apple directs ComiXology to yank 56 comics about sex, Satan, & gay heroes


comixology mobileWhile the new subscriptions don’t offer any kind of discount on the books you purchase, the company is also offering new bundles of different comics that will be.

In addition to the subscriptions and bundles, the company has been quite busy sprucing up other parts of its business and comic reader service. Earlier this year it announced plans to add content from other countries across Europe, and even set up a new international office in France. More recently, the company rolled out new reader enhancements like being able to automatically fit comic pages to a device’s orientation and a new two-page view.

(Note:  If you’re curious about how to scale mobile experiences across multiple platforms like ComiXology is doing, check out VentureBeat’s MobileBeat 2013 conference July 9-10. )


Filed under: Media, Mobile Tags: , , , ,

Microsoft launches web-based Xbox Music app to better compete with Spotify

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Microsoft has launched a new web-based version of its Xbox Music app, a move to take on other streaming music services such as Spotify, Rdio, and Rhapsody.

Xbox Music has been available in some form since October of last year with apps for Xbox 360, Windows 8 PCs and tablets, Windows RT devices, and Windows Phone 8. Rumors of an Xbox Music app for the web have been swirling for a bit, but it finally is live today.

The new web app is reminiscent of the latest version of Xbox Music found in Windows 8.1 Preview. It’s quite a bare-bones experience without any music discovery features and focuses simply on your collection and the ability to search for music you know. You can also create playlists by going through search results and hitting the plus button next to a song.

Xbox Music costs $10 per month for its premium version, which includes web access. You can also use Xbox Music inside Windows 8 and Windows Phone for free.

With the recent launches of Apple’s iTunes Radio and Google Play Music All Access and the continued popularity of apps like Pandora and Spotify, the streaming music landscape is fierce. We will see how well Xbox Music will be able to compete with these services.

Check out a few more screens from the app below.


Filed under: Media Tags: , , , , ,

Editorially curated site Upworthy sees explosive growth

June 30th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

megaphone

Finding good content on the Internet can be tedious at times, so it’s not difficult to see why a site like Upworthy is currently experiencing impressive growth.

The site, cofounded by Peter Koechley (formerly of The Onion) and former MoveOn.org organizer Eli Pariser, was built to unearth articles, videos, and photos that “matter.” Over the last month, Upworthy has hit a few traffic milestones, including a total 30 million unique visitors to the site, an average of six minutes spent on the site per user per visit, and over 3 million subscribers (via social networks, email, etc.).

The site employs a team of editors (six full-time and about 20 contributors) to curate the most important news of the day. Those curators not only find the most compelling content, they also rewrite the headlines, craft summaries of the content, and find an appropriate piece of art. It reminds me a lot of the old Digg — or lesser-known site Mixx — except this one is powered entirely by the people who are just really good at finding news (like my good friend MrBabyman, aka Andy Sorcini, did during Digg’s heyday.) Upworthy’s platform also helps share all that content across social networks and tracks what’s getting attention.

“We put as much effort into our distribution efforts as we do in finding good content,” Koechley toldVentureBeat. “Having good content doesn’t mean anything if you aren’t actively trying to get people to see it.”

News curation is nothing new. Many news publications (VentureBeat included) have done it directly or indirectly for years, as have sites like Digg, Reddit, and a growing number of news reader services (Zite, Pulse, News360, etc.). Occasionally it’s responsible for surfacing viral content, but there’s a considerable amount of time and energy involved. But Koechley told me Upworthy wants to stay conscious of making the process of surfacing viral content using its close-knit team of curators, and letting its distribution and tracking platform guide them.

Megaphone image via Shutterstock


Filed under: Media, Social
    


Tags: , , ,

Editorially curated site Upworthy sees explosive growth

June 30th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

megaphone

Finding good content to consume on the Internet can be tedious at times, so it’s not difficult to see why a site like Upworthy is currently experiencing impressive growth.

The site, is cofounded by Peter Koechley (formerly of The Onion) and former MoveOn.org organizer Eli Pariser, was built o unearth the articles, videos, and photos that “matter.” And over the last month, Upworthy saw a few traffic milestones, including a total 30 million unique visitors to the site, an average of six minutes spent on the site per user per visit, and over 3 million subscribers (via social networks, email, etc.).

Upworthy itself is a site that employs a team of editors (six full-time and about 20 contributors) to curate the most important news of the day — or rather for each day — that everyone should see. Those curators not only find the most compelling content, they also rewrite the headlines, craft summaries of the content, and find an appropriate piece of art. It reminds me a lot of the old Digg or lesser known site Mixx, except this one is powered entirely by the people who are just really good at finding news (like my good friend MrBabyman, aka Andy Sorcini, did during Digg’s hey day.) Upworthy’s platform also helps share all that content across social networks and track what’s getting attention.

“We put as much effort into our distribution efforts as we do in finding good content,” said Upworthy founder Peter Koechley in an interview with VentureBeat. “Having good content doesn’t mean anything if you aren’t actively trying to get people to see it.”

News curation is nothing new. Many news publications (VentureBeat included) have done it directly or indirectly for years as well as sites like Digg, Reddit, and a growing number of news reader services (Zite, Pulse, News360, etc.). And occasionally, it’s responsible for surfacing viral content, but there’s a considerable amount of time and energy involved. But Koechley told me Upworthy wants to stay conscious of making the process of surfacing viral content using its close-knit team of curators, and letting its distribution and tracking platform guide them.

Megaphone image via Shutterstock


Filed under: Media, Social
    


Tags: , , ,

Google Reader goes away tomorrow. Here’s what you need to do now

June 30th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

You can’t say you haven’t been warned: Google announced in March that it would be shutting down Google Reader, its popular RSS newsfeed reader, on July 1.

Heads up: Tomorrow is July 1, and you won’t be able to access the site after that.

If you’re a Google Reader user, here’s what you need to do.

First, make a backup of your RSS subscriptions. Go to Reader Settings (the gear icon in the upper right of the Reader screen), then click on the Import/Export tab.  Click on the option to export your subscriptions via Google Takeout. You’ll need to re-authenticate with Google. Then choose the services you want to export, select Reader, and click the “Create Archive” button to download a .zip file containing everything.

The most important file in that archive is a file called subscriptions.xml, which is an OPML file you can import into other news readers to re-create your subscriptions list.

Second, find a good RSS newsreader alternative. Feedly has proven to be one of the most popular of the pre-post-Google Reader era, and it’s likely to stick around for awhile, especially since Reader’s demise helped Feedly triple its user base in just three months. It offers a “one-click Google Reader import” button that will import your Google Reader subscriptions without even requiring the archive file you created above.

Other free, web-based newsreaders you might consider are NetVibes and NewsBlur. I’ve also found Skimr useful, although it’s pretty bare-bones, and works better if you’ve got just a handful of subscriptions than it does for massive collections of RSS feeds like the 600+ I have in my files.

Check out some other Google Reader alternatives in our March post.

Third, consider setting up email notifications for your most important RSS feeds. One of the things Google Reader was good at was keeping track of what you’ve read and what you haven’t. That’s not so important for most of the sources in a “river of news,” since you just need to dip in every once in awhile to see what’s happening.

But what about RSS feeds where you want to make sure you see every single post, like a competitor’s blog? For these, an automated service like IFTTT.com can be indispensable, because it can direct those items into your inbox. Yahoo Pipes (yes, it’s still around) could also manage a similar trick, using Yahoo’s somewhat hidden option to deliver results via email. Or, check out Feed2Mail, which mails RSS feeds to you simply and easily.

As an added bonus, emailing an RSS feed into your inbox will make its stories available to you offline, via your mail client’s offline capabilities. That’s something many feed readers don’t offer.


Filed under: Dev, Media
    


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