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Posts Tagged ‘kinect’

‘Doodle Jump For Kinect’ Review – High Jump Hijinks

July 1st, 2013 No comments

Doodle Jump For Kinect

For a game to make the jump from a portable device to home console there are many, many platforms to land on along the way. While porting over a game might be easy, retaining the essence of what makes it good is usually the hardest hurdle to clear. The latest game to try to make the massive leap from smartphones (Android, iOS, BlackBerry, etc) to a whole new world of consoles is the wildly successful "Doodle Jump." With fifteen million downloads across all of its previous platforms, it clearly has the high profile visibility that it needs to succeed in a new realm of competition, but can the simple and addictive gameplay of the original help it find success on the Xbox 360... as a Kinect game?

"Doodle Jump for Kinect" retains the same core gameplay that its small screen counterparts had, while adding in full-body motion controls to simulate the movements of the Doodler. The overall objective is still the same: safely get from the bottom of the level to the top as you guide the Doodler from the left to right as he jumps from platform to platform. As long as you avoid monsters, cannonballs, and breakaway rocks along the way, you'll do just fine. In the Kinect version, players guide the Doodler left and right by stepping left or right, using their body as a replacement for their finger. This release includes three all-new, original worlds, allowing fans of the original game to have an entirely unique experience.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Getting into "Doodle Jump" isn't that hard; all you need to do is step left or right to direct the Doodler as he ascends each level. While he reacts best to full body movements, the camera will pick up even the slightest leans, which allow players a higher level of precision - a necessity for picking up bonus coins and power-ups. In addition to jumping, players must also use their arms to shoot and initiate power-ups like wings (flapping your arms) and rocket boosters (arms above your head). As long as players don't get too much into the habit of leaning, "Doodle Jump" is a rare Kinect game that can actually be played in a relatively confined space, without a ton of physical activity. Even the more challenging boss battles, which require more focus and attention, can be overcome with the motion controls… and a bit of practice practice.

To say this version of "Doodle Jump" brings something new to the table would be a bit of an exaggeration. Outside of the controls and the platform, the fundamentals of the game are essentially the same as the portable versions, which means that if you've already burned out on the original, this one might not be for you. That being said, this release doesn't offer a ton of variety either. The three worlds offer some new visuals, and enemies, but the simplicity that makes the game great, is also what makes it redundant. The Doodler is always headed up, and all that really changes is the path that he takes.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Every iteration of "Doodle Jump" seems to serve as a weird metaphor for life, since the Doodler never really dies, he just gets set back a bit, and has to keep trying until he gets it right. The Kinect version retains these same sensibilities, and should appeal to anyone that has gotten addicted to "Doodle Jump" in the past, only this time, they have to get on their feet to play it.

There is a reason "Doodle Jump" has been downloaded over fifteen million times - it's simple, fun, and addictive, and most of that holds true for the Kinect version as well. Controlling the Doodler with your body keeps the player's activity to a minimum, which, when it comes to Kinect, less tends to be better. The game may be a bit on the short side, but it's priced right for its abbreviated experience, and you can always go back to try to earn three stars on every level (good luck with that). While an experience like this might be a bit easier with the precision of a game controller, "Doodle Jump" was never really intended to be a precise game. Finding simple and fun Kinect games isn't always easy, but "Doodle Jump" seems to find the sweet spot for both.

Score: 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Project X Zone' Review - Let Our Powers Combine
'Rogue Legacy' Review (PC) -- Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again...

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Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

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‘Doodle Jump For Kinect’ Review – High Jump Hijinks

July 1st, 2013 No comments

Doodle Jump For Kinect

For a game to make the jump from a portable device to home console there are many, many platforms to land on along the way. While porting over a game might be easy, retaining the essence of what makes it good is usually the hardest hurdle to clear. The latest game to try to make the massive leap from smartphones (Android, iOS, BlackBerry, etc) to a whole new world of consoles is the wildly successful "Doodle Jump." With fifteen million downloads across all of its previous platforms, it clearly has the high profile visibility that it needs to succeed in a new realm of competition, but can the simple and addictive gameplay of the original help it find success on the Xbox 360... as a Kinect game?

"Doodle Jump for Kinect" retains the same core gameplay that its small screen counterparts had, while adding in full-body motion controls to simulate the movements of the Doodler. The overall objective is still the same: safely get from the bottom of the level to the top as you guide the Doodler from the left to right as he jumps from platform to platform. As long as you avoid monsters, cannonballs, and breakaway rocks along the way, you'll do just fine. In the Kinect version, players guide the Doodler left and right by stepping left or right, using their body as a replacement for their finger. This release includes three all-new, original worlds, allowing fans of the original game to have an entirely unique experience.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Getting into "Doodle Jump" isn't that hard; all you need to do is step left or right to direct the Doodler as he ascends each level. While he reacts best to full body movements, the camera will pick up even the slightest leans, which allow players a higher level of precision - a necessity for picking up bonus coins and power-ups. In addition to jumping, players must also use their arms to shoot and initiate power-ups like wings (flapping your arms) and rocket boosters (arms above your head). As long as players don't get too much into the habit of leaning, "Doodle Jump" is a rare Kinect game that can actually be played in a relatively confined space, without a ton of physical activity. Even the more challenging boss battles, which require more focus and attention, can be overcome with the motion controls… and a bit of practice practice.

To say this version of "Doodle Jump" brings something new to the table would be a bit of an exaggeration. Outside of the controls and the platform, the fundamentals of the game are essentially the same as the portable versions, which means that if you've already burned out on the original, this one might not be for you. That being said, this release doesn't offer a ton of variety either. The three worlds offer some new visuals, and enemies, but the simplicity that makes the game great, is also what makes it redundant. The Doodler is always headed up, and all that really changes is the path that he takes.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Every iteration of "Doodle Jump" seems to serve as a weird metaphor for life, since the Doodler never really dies, he just gets set back a bit, and has to keep trying until he gets it right. The Kinect version retains these same sensibilities, and should appeal to anyone that has gotten addicted to "Doodle Jump" in the past, only this time, they have to get on their feet to play it.

There is a reason "Doodle Jump" has been downloaded over fifteen million times - it's simple, fun, and addictive, and most of that holds true for the Kinect version as well. Controlling the Doodler with your body keeps the player's activity to a minimum, which, when it comes to Kinect, less tends to be better. The game may be a bit on the short side, but it's priced right for its abbreviated experience, and you can always go back to try to earn three stars on every level (good luck with that). While an experience like this might be a bit easier with the precision of a game controller, "Doodle Jump" was never really intended to be a precise game. Finding simple and fun Kinect games isn't always easy, but "Doodle Jump" seems to find the sweet spot for both.

Score: 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Project X Zone' Review - Let Our Powers Combine
'Rogue Legacy' Review (PC) -- Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again...

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

Tags: , , , , ,

‘Doodle Jump For Kinect’ Review – High Jump Hijinks

July 1st, 2013 No comments

Doodle Jump For Kinect

For a game to make the jump from a portable device to home console there are many, many platforms to land on along the way. While porting over a game might be easy, retaining the essence of what makes it good is usually the hardest hurdle to clear. The latest game to try to make the massive leap from smartphones (Android, iOS, BlackBerry, etc) to a whole new world of consoles is the wildly successful "Doodle Jump." With fifteen million downloads across all of its previous platforms, it clearly has the high profile visibility that it needs to succeed in a new realm of competition, but can the simple and addictive gameplay of the original help it find success on the Xbox 360... as a Kinect game?

"Doodle Jump for Kinect" retains the same core gameplay that its small screen counterparts had, while adding in full-body motion controls to simulate the movements of the Doodler. The overall objective is still the same: safely get from the bottom of the level to the top as you guide the Doodler from the left to right as he jumps from platform to platform. As long as you avoid monsters, cannonballs, and breakaway rocks along the way, you'll do just fine. In the Kinect version, players guide the Doodler left and right by stepping left or right, using their body as a replacement for their finger. This release includes three all-new, original worlds, allowing fans of the original game to have an entirely unique experience.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Getting into "Doodle Jump" isn't that hard; all you need to do is step left or right to direct the Doodler as he ascends each level. While he reacts best to full body movements, the camera will pick up even the slightest leans, which allow players a higher level of precision - a necessity for picking up bonus coins and power-ups. In addition to jumping, players must also use their arms to shoot and initiate power-ups like wings (flapping your arms) and rocket boosters (arms above your head). As long as players don't get too much into the habit of leaning, "Doodle Jump" is a rare Kinect game that can actually be played in a relatively confined space, without a ton of physical activity. Even the more challenging boss battles, which require more focus and attention, can be overcome with the motion controls… and a bit of practice practice.

To say this version of "Doodle Jump" brings something new to the table would be a bit of an exaggeration. Outside of the controls and the platform, the fundamentals of the game are essentially the same as the portable versions, which means that if you've already burned out on the original, this one might not be for you. That being said, this release doesn't offer a ton of variety either. The three worlds offer some new visuals, and enemies, but the simplicity that makes the game great, is also what makes it redundant. The Doodler is always headed up, and all that really changes is the path that he takes.

Doodle Jump For Kinect

Every iteration of "Doodle Jump" seems to serve as a weird metaphor for life, since the Doodler never really dies, he just gets set back a bit, and has to keep trying until he gets it right. The Kinect version retains these same sensibilities, and should appeal to anyone that has gotten addicted to "Doodle Jump" in the past, only this time, they have to get on their feet to play it.

There is a reason "Doodle Jump" has been downloaded over fifteen million times - it's simple, fun, and addictive, and most of that holds true for the Kinect version as well. Controlling the Doodler with your body keeps the player's activity to a minimum, which, when it comes to Kinect, less tends to be better. The game may be a bit on the short side, but it's priced right for its abbreviated experience, and you can always go back to try to earn three stars on every level (good luck with that). While an experience like this might be a bit easier with the precision of a game controller, "Doodle Jump" was never really intended to be a precise game. Finding simple and fun Kinect games isn't always easy, but "Doodle Jump" seems to find the sweet spot for both.

Score: 4 out of 5

Related Posts
'Project X Zone' Review - Let Our Powers Combine
'Rogue Legacy' Review (PC) -- Avenging Your Father, Again and Again and Again...

--

Follow @MTVMultiplayer on Twitter and be sure to "like" us on Facebook for the best geek news about comics, toys, gaming and more!

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FIFA 14 to feature Messi and Chicharito on North American cover

June 29th, 2013 No comments
FIFA 14 to feature Messi and Chicharito on North American cover
The North American cover for FIFA 14 will feature both Lionel Messi and Manchester United's Javier "Chicharito" Hernandez, EA Sports announced. Fans in the US will have the option of the dual-athlete cover or the global cover, which only features Messi. Hernandez will also have his own solo cover art for the game in Mexico.

The FIFA cover was announced as part of a multi-year endorsement deal signed by Hernandez with EA Sports. The publisher noted that Hernandez will specifically appear on Xbox 360 and PS3 versions of the game. EA Sports also recently announced that New Jersey Devils goalie Martin Brodeur won the cover vote for NHL 14.

The FIFA series has a distinct trend in terms of its cover athletes. Messi seems much more distraught this year compared to the FIFA 13 cover. It's likely that he's fully taken over the "angry shouting guy" duties previously held by Wayne Rooney as recently as FIFA 12. If the trend holds up, we await a ticked-off Chicharito on the box for FIFA 15.

JoystiqFIFA 14 to feature Messi and Chicharito on North American cover originally appeared on Joystiq on Sat, 29 Jun 2013 18:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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FIFA 14 to feature Messi and Chicharito on North American cover

June 29th, 2013 No comments
FIFA 14 to feature Messi and Chicharito on North American cover
The North American cover for FIFA 14 will feature both Lionel Messi and Manchester United's Javier "Chicharito" Hernandez, EA Sports announced. Fans in the US will have the option of the dual-athlete cover or the global cover, which only features Messi. Hernandez will also have his own solo cover art for the game in Mexico.

The FIFA cover was announced as part of a multi-year endorsement deal signed by Hernandez with EA Sports. The publisher noted that Hernandez will specifically appear on Xbox 360 and PS3 versions of the game. EA Sports also recently announced that New Jersey Devils goalie Martin Brodeur won the cover vote for NHL 14.

The FIFA series has a distinct trend in terms of its cover athletes. Messi seems much more distraught this year compared to the FIFA 13 cover. It's likely that he's fully taken over the "angry shouting guy" duties previously held by Wayne Rooney as recently as FIFA 12. If the trend holds up, we await a ticked-off Chicharito on the box for FIFA 15.

JoystiqFIFA 14 to feature Messi and Chicharito on North American cover originally appeared on Joystiq on Sat, 29 Jun 2013 18:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Time Warner Cable bringing live TV to Xbox 360 later this summer

June 28th, 2013 No comments
Time Warner Cable bringing live TV to Xbox 360 later this summer
A new Time Warner Cable app coming to Xbox 360 later this summer promises access to 300 live television channels, Xbox Wire has announced. The new Time Warner app, which requires Xbox Live Gold and a Time Warner subscription, will offer more live TV channels than any other on Xbox 360.

The announcement follows Microsoft's Xbox reveal event and E3 press conference, where Microsoft showcased integrated live television on the Xbox One. Microsoft's entertainment division, overseen by former CBS executive Nancy Tellem, also announced an upcoming Halo live-action series in collaboration with Steven Spielberg. Last week, i love bees creator Elan Lee joined the division.

JoystiqTime Warner Cable bringing live TV to Xbox 360 later this summer originally appeared on Joystiq on Fri, 28 Jun 2013 10:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Xbox One bundled Kinect won’t plug into PCs

June 27th, 2013 No comments
Xbox One Kinect won't plug into PCs, Kinect for Windows does
The Kinect that comes with Xbox One consoles includes a proprietary connector that won't plug into PCs, Microsoft tells Ars Technica. That's why Microsoft now has a "Kinect for Windows" version - it launched an early-access Kinect for Windows SDK program yesterday.

"The Kinect for Xbox One sensor will not have an adapter that allows it to plug into a computer," Microsoft says. "The new generation Kinect for Windows sensor will connect to computers using a standard USB3 port."

Microsoft has no plans to launch an adapter that allows the console Kinect to plug into a PC, the site says. Both Kinects are built on a "shared set of technologies," but Microsoft says, "The new generation Kinect for Windows sensor will be a fully tested, licensed, and supported Kinect experience on Windows. Kinect for Xbox One is being built for and tested with the Xbox One."

The Kinect for Windows SDK is available now in Microsoft's early-access program, which runs $400 and includes private support from the Windows engineering team, access to all API, the early sensor and the final version, and the early and updated SDK.

JoystiqXbox One bundled Kinect won't plug into PCs originally appeared on Joystiq on Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Microsoft and Unity tool up for Xbox One, Windows development

June 27th, 2013 No comments
Microsoft and Unity come together on Xbox One
Soon developers using Unity Pro 4 will be able to port their games to the Windows Store on PC, Windows Phone 8 and Xbox One, the Unity blog has announced.

This partnership will see Microsoft and Unity collaborating to add support for "enhanced Kinect gestures and recognition, multiplayer matchmaking, SmartGlass and cloud stuff" in Unity Pro 4 for Xbox One. If an outfit is using Unity to create a game for Microsoft Studios, then Unity tools for Xbox 360 and Xbox One will be offered gratis. Publishing games on the Windows Store will also be free.

Unity is one of the more popular multi-platform engines out there right now. In March, Unity announced it had entered a similar partnership with Sony to offer tools tailored to Sony platforms, including the PS4, and last month Unity made its mobile development tools available free of charge to all indie developers.

JoystiqMicrosoft and Unity tool up for Xbox One, Windows development originally appeared on Joystiq on Thu, 27 Jun 2013 18:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Report says fitness video games are proliferating as gamers get off the couch

June 27th, 2013 No comments

 

Gamers play Just Dance 2014 at E3 2013
Dean Takahashi

Gamers play Just Dance 2014 at E3 2013

Fitness video games have grown sharply in the past decade, according to a new report released by the game industry’s trade group and a White House study group. That means that getting gamers to exercise is no longer just a novelty; it’s a $750 million a year business.

The Entertainment Software Association the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition said that 20 percent of all games released in 2011 were ‘”active games,” or those that required gamers to expend energy aside from tapping buttons on a controller. That compares to just 5 percent during the period from 2002 to 2007.

“The enthusiasm surrounding active video games is fundamentally transforming how we play and engage in physical activity,” said Erik Huey, senior vice president for government affairs at ESA, in a statement. “Not only is this expanding market segment a promising growth opportunity for our industry, it is motivating families to exercise and lead healthier, more fulfilling lives.”

The report credited active games to the emergence of motion-sensing game consoles such as the Nintendo Wii and Microsoft’s Kinect for the Xbox 360. Active game sales generated about $750 million in revenues in 2012 and they are expected to be a continued revenue driver for the industry through 2015.

“It’s widely known that all kids should be active at least 60 minutes a day, but unfortunately only one-in-three kids are getting that recommended amount and study’s show they are now consuming over 7.5 hours of screen time every day,” said PCFSN member and NBA All-Star Chris Paul, in a statement. “And that’s why I’m excited about the growing number of video games that are helping kids and families get active.”

EEDAR, a game market researcher, conducted the study and found that active games encourage healthy activity among children, engage new audiences in physical education classes, and provide a fun activity. More than 90 percent of the active video games released from 2002 to 2012 were rated E or E10+ for all ages and those 10 years older and up.

The ESA and PCFSN are releasing a new challenge dubbed the Active Play Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+). The fitness award encourages kids to be active for an hour each day.

 

 


Filed under: Business, Games

GamesBeat 2013GamesBeat 2013 is our fifth annual conference on disruption in the video game market. You'll get 360-degree perspectives from top gaming executives, developers, and analysts on what’s to come in the industry. Our theme this year is “The Battle Royal.” Check out full event details here, and grab your early-bird tickets here!
    


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Report says fitness video games are proliferating as gamers get off the couch

June 27th, 2013 No comments

Fitness video games have grown sharply in the past decade, according to a new report released by the game industry’s trade group and a White House study group. That means that getting gamers to exercise is no longer just a novelty; it’s a $750 million a year business.

The Entertainment Software Association and the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition said that 20 percent of all games released in 2011 were ‘”active games,” or those that required gamers to expend energy aside from tapping buttons on a controller. That compares to just 5 percent during the period from 2002 to 2007.

“The enthusiasm surrounding active video games is fundamentally transforming how we play and engage in physical activity,” said Erik Huey, the senior vice president for government affairs at ESA, in a statement. “Not only is this expanding market segment a promising growth opportunity for our industry, but it is also motivating families to exercise and lead healthier, more fulfilling lives.”

The report credited active games to the emergence of motion-sensing game consoles such as the Nintendo Wii and Microsoft’s Kinect for the Xbox 360. Active game sales generated about $750 million in revenues in 2012, and they are expected to be a continued revenue driver for the industry through 2015.

“It’s widely known that all kids should be active at least 60 minutes a day, but unfortunately, only one-in-three kids are getting that recommended amount, and studies show they are now consuming over 7.5 hours of screen time every day,” said PCFSN member and NBA All-Star Chris Paul of the Los Angeles Clippers in a statement. “And that’s why I’m excited about the growing number of video games that are helping kids and families get active.”

EEDAR, a game market researcher, conducted the study and found that active games encourage healthy activity among children, engage new audiences in physical education classes, and provide a fun activity. More than 90 percent of the active video games released from 2002 to 2012 were rated E or E10+ for all ages and those 10 years older and up.

The ESA and PCFSN are releasing a new challenge dubbed the Active Play Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+). The fitness award encourages kids to be active for an hour each day.


Filed under: Business, Games

GamesBeat 2013GamesBeat 2013 is our fifth annual conference on disruption in the video game market. You'll get 360-degree perspectives from top gaming executives, developers, and analysts on what’s to come in the industry. Our theme this year is “The Battle Royal.” Check out full event details here, and grab your early-bird tickets here!
    


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