_gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageLoadTime']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘enterprise’

Intuit sells off its financial services unit for $1B

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Intuit is selling off its financial services unit, which provides online and mobile software to banks, to Thoma Bravo for $1.03 billion in cash.

Private equity firm Thoma Bravo will gain digital payments and rewards system, as well as an Internet and mobile banking system.

The move will help Mountain View, Calif-based Intuit focus on reaching small businesses and individuals with its tax-preparation and financial management software. CEO Brad Smith is fond of saying that 20 percent of the country’s GDP flows through Quickbooks, Intuit’s flagship accounting toolset.

Intuit is shedding one of its smallest business units, which represents just nine percent of the company’s total net revenue in 2012. It currently has about 730 employees, the New York Times estimates.

The news was announced in a statement Monday. The terms of the deal dictate that Intuit will hold on to the jewel in its personal finance crown, Mint.com, and its Open Financial Exchange connectivity unit.

Intuit has been around for 30 years, but wants to be associated with cutting-edge technology. It describes itself as a “startup,” and like Google, offers employees a percentage of time to focus on innovation. For more on this topic, check out our recent Q&A with Intuit founder Scott Cook here.

Intuit plans to use the proceeds from the deal to buy back stock.


Filed under: Big Data, Business, Cloud, Deals, Enterprise
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Intuit sells off its financial services unit for $1B

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Intuit is selling off its financial services unit, which provides online and mobile software to banks, to Thoma Bravo for $1.03 billion in cash.

Private equity firm Thoma Bravo will gain digital payments and rewards system, as well as an Internet and mobile banking system.

The move will help Mountain View, Calif-based Intuit focus on reaching small businesses and individuals with its tax-preparation and financial management software. CEO Brad Smith is fond of saying that 20 percent of the country’s GDP flows through Quickbooks, Intuit’s flagship accounting toolset.

The business unit being sold is one of Intuit’s smallest; it represents just nine percent of the company’s total net revenue in 2012. It currently has about 730 employees, the New York Times estimates.

The news was announced in a statement Monday. The terms of the deal dictate that Intuit will hold onto the jewel in its personal finance crown, Mint.com, and its Open Financial Exchange connectivity unit.

Intuit has been around for 30 years, but wants to be associated with cutting-edge technology. It describes itself as a “startup,” and like Google, it offers employees a percentage of time to focus on innovation. For more on this topic, check out our recent Q&A with Intuit founder Scott Cook here.

Intuit plans to use the proceeds from the deal to buy back stock.


Filed under: Big Data, Business, Cloud, Deals, Enterprise Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Intuit sells off its financial services unit for $1B

July 1st, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Intuit is selling off its financial services unit, which provides online and mobile software to banks, to Thoma Bravo for $1.03 billion in cash.

Private equity firm Thoma Bravo will gain digital payments and rewards system, as well as an Internet and mobile banking system.

The move will help Mountain View, Calif-based Intuit focus on reaching small businesses and individuals with its tax-preparation and financial management software. CEO Brad Smith is fond of saying that 20 percent of the country’s GDP flows through Quickbooks, Intuit’s flagship accounting toolset.

Intuit is shedding one of its smallest business units, which represents just nine percent of the company’s total net revenue in 2012. It currently has about 730 employees, the New York Times estimates.

The news was announced in a statement Monday. The terms of the deal dictate that Intuit will hold on to the jewel in its personal finance crown, Mint.com, and its Open Financial Exchange connectivity unit.

Intuit has been around for 30 years, but wants to be associated with cutting-edge technology. It describes itself as a “startup,” and like Google, offers employees a percentage of time to focus on innovation. For more on this topic, check out our recent Q&A with Intuit founder Scott Cook here.

Intuit plans to use the proceeds from the deal to buy back stock.


Filed under: Big Data, Business, Cloud, Deals, Enterprise
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Why we chose to HQ our startup in Vegas

June 28th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

This guest post is a follow-up to our three-part series on the Downtown Project, Leveraging Las Vegas. Read the full series here.

I’ve worked as an entrepreneur in New York/New Jersey, Chile, San Francisco, and the Valley, but my cofounder and I recently moved our HQ to downtown Vegas.

Understandably, Las Vegas isn’t among the first cities that come to mind when one thinks startups. But it may be soon. VentureBeat recently interviewed me for its Vegas series, and I wanted to follow up with some thoughts of my own about my experience as a member of the VegasTech community.

While I certainly had some doubts about living in Sin City, upon being exposed to Downtown and the Vegas tech community, I realized that Las Vegas has a lot to offer in addition to the Strip. It the foundation on which it was built upon.

Like all cities, Vegas also has pros and cons:

Low Cost of Living: It’s a factor that many people overlook. The burn rate for a startup in Vegas is significantly lower than in other cities throughout the country. Nevada is also an unbelievably business-friendly state to live in. 0% income tax? Sign me up!

The Hospitality Industry: This tourist hotspot is a great place for my company, Zuldi, to call home. We are in close proximity to the Vegas strip and have access to thousands of restaurants, nightclubs, and bars in what some would call the Mecca of the hospitality industry. Last year Vegas saw a record number of tourists. Officials are hopeful that this upcoming year will break the 40 million mark. From the perspective of a tech business catering to this industry, it makes sense for us not only to be here but also to thrive here.

Community: I’m surrounded by passionate, driven, and happy people who are genuinely interested in seeing those around them succeed. Las Vegas attracts people from all walks of life, which is a healthy environment for an entrepreneur to be in — especially one with a turban and a beard. Living in downtown also means that my team and I get to actively participate in the various events that TechCocktail, the Downtown Project, Catalyst Week, and local community members organize.

Conferences & Visitors: Las Vegas is one of the most popular host cities in the world, for trade shows, conferences, and meetings. As a startup we get to take full advantage of the constant stream of international visitors. It’s not too difficult to convince someone to pay us a visit.

24/7: Team Zuldi functions at all odd hours of the day but particularly late at night. Being in a city that operates 24/7 makes it possible for the team to do just that.

Weather: While it may get a little too hot mid-summer, the warm weather is a major plus. Team Zuldi certainly doesn’t complain about the rooftop pool!

Recruiting: Now for something on the downside. There is a lack of a qualified talent pool from which a startup can recruit. Unlike Silicon Valley, Las Vegas is not home to multiple major universities; though, UNLV has been adamant about supporting entrepreneurship.

Fundraising: Vegas also lacks an angel/VC community. Current startups in Vegas are predominantly being invested in by the Downtown Project’s VegasTechFund. However, being only an hour’s flight away from SFO and LAX makes interactions with California-based investors convenient.

It’s inspiring to have Zappos, a Silicon Valley founded startup that’s now an IPO’d giant flourishing in Downtown Las Vegas. In addition, Switch, is headquartered in Vegas and has been actively supporting the Vegas Tech community. Elon Musk’s SolarCity, is now also calling Vegas home.

I am thankful to all of the Vegas Tech community members for being dedicated to making Vegas a great place for an entrepreneur. My cofounder, Gal Dolber, and I have no plans to relocate our HQ, and we’re looking forward to building Zuldi in Downtown Las Vegas.

NYTech (1)Hartej Singh Sawhney is the Co-founder and CEO of Zuldi, a POS-integrated mobile ordering and payment processing system. He’s passionate about building awesome things with amazing people.
You can find him on Twitter @HartejSingh

Filed under: Business, Enterprise, Entrepreneur
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Why we chose to HQ our startup in Vegas

June 28th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

This guest post is a follow-up to our three-part series on the Downtown Project, Leveraging Las Vegas. Read the full series here.

I’ve worked as an entrepreneur in New York/New Jersey, Chile, San Francisco, and the Valley, but my cofounder and I recently moved our HQ to downtown Vegas.

Understandably, Las Vegas isn’t among the first cities that come to mind when one thinks startups. But it may be soon. VentureBeat recently interviewed me for its Vegas series, and I wanted to follow up with some thoughts of my own about my experience as a member of the VegasTech community.

While I certainly had some doubts about living in Sin City, upon being exposed to Downtown and the Vegas tech community, I realized that Las Vegas has a lot to offer in addition to the Strip. It the foundation on which it was built upon.

Like all cities, Vegas also has pros and cons:

Low Cost of Living: It’s a factor that many people overlook. The burn rate for a startup in Vegas is significantly lower than in other cities throughout the country. Nevada is also an unbelievably business-friendly state to live in. 0% income tax? Sign me up!

The Hospitality Industry: This tourist hotspot is a great place for my company, Zuldi, to call home. We are in close proximity to the Vegas strip and have access to thousands of restaurants, nightclubs, and bars in what some would call the Mecca of the hospitality industry. Last year Vegas saw a record number of tourists. Officials are hopeful that this upcoming year will break the 40 million mark. From the perspective of a tech business catering to this industry, it makes sense for us not only to be here but also to thrive here.

Community: I’m surrounded by passionate, driven, and happy people who are genuinely interested in seeing those around them succeed. Las Vegas attracts people from all walks of life, which is a healthy environment for an entrepreneur to be in — especially one with a turban and a beard. Living in downtown also means that my team and I get to actively participate in the various events that TechCocktail, the Downtown Project, Catalyst Week, and local community members organize.

Conferences & Visitors: Las Vegas is one of the most popular host cities in the world, for trade shows, conferences, and meetings. As a startup we get to take full advantage of the constant stream of international visitors. It’s not too difficult to convince someone to pay us a visit.

24/7: Team Zuldi functions at all odd hours of the day but particularly late at night. Being in a city that operates 24/7 makes it possible for the team to do just that.

Weather: While it may get a little too hot mid-summer, the warm weather is a major plus. Team Zuldi certainly doesn’t complain about the rooftop pool!

Recruiting: Now for something on the downside. There is a lack of a qualified talent pool from which a startup can recruit. Unlike Silicon Valley, Las Vegas is not home to multiple major universities; though, UNLV has been adamant about supporting entrepreneurship.

Fundraising: Vegas also lacks an angel/VC community. Current startups in Vegas are predominantly being invested in by the Downtown Project’s VegasTechFund. However, being only an hour’s flight away from SFO and LAX makes interactions with California-based investors convenient.

It’s inspiring to have Zappos, a Silicon Valley founded startup that’s now an IPO’d giant flourishing in Downtown Las Vegas. In addition, Switch, is headquartered in Vegas and has been actively supporting the Vegas Tech community. Elon Musk’s SolarCity, is now also calling Vegas home.

I am thankful to all of the Vegas Tech community members for being dedicated to making Vegas a great place for an entrepreneur. My cofounder, Gal Dolber, and I have no plans to relocate our HQ, and we’re looking forward to building Zuldi in Downtown Las Vegas.

NYTech (1)Hartej Singh Sawhney is the Co-founder and CEO of Zuldi, a POS-integrated mobile ordering and payment processing system. He’s passionate about building awesome things with amazing people.
You can find him on Twitter @HartejSingh

Filed under: Business, Enterprise, Entrepreneur
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Bright Sun Group’s data analysis can help investors find ‘diamonds in the rough’ (exclusive)

June 28th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Venture capitalists can no longer rely on outdated statistics and gut feelings.

As we reported, a Moneyball-style revolution is taking place in Silicon Valley, and other tech hubs around the world. Prestigious venture capital firms are investing in data science teams and quantitative tools to track the private markets. The younger firms are going one step further by creating an entire investment thesis around data.

“Algorithms will be the heart and soul of due diligence — it’s not just a sanity-check mechanism,” said Matt Oguz, the managing partner of new investment firm Palo Alto Venture Science. “It’s the only way to cut through human bias.”

A group of three friends, self-proclaimed “ex-Hedge Fund quant nerds,” have been tracking this shift for years. In the height of the recession, they decided to quit their steady corporate jobs to launch Bright Sun Group. The goal is to help investors find the “diamond in the rough” investment, and not just fight for the attention of the trendiest startups. (See herd mentality.”)

Data-driven investing is a hotly disputed topic in Silicon Valley. Venture capitalists like David Hornik believe that algorithms are a non-starter. “If you are a good venture investor, you are better off applying your own judgment than you are collecting data on how everyone else invests and performs,” Hornik told me.

Cofounder Stephen Piron is aware of the discord, but believes it’s only a matter of time before investors embrace the data. “There has been a sea change [and] things are shifting very quickly,” he explained.

We meet at a coffee shop in London to discuss how to track private companies. Piron, who formerly worked on the analytics team at Man Investments and ITG Canada, has been heads down building the technology for a number of years. ”We’re living in a world where even the discretionary funds have some kind of electronic component,” said Piron.

Piron doesn’t believe that Bright Sun’s technology will replace human investors entirely. But it can be used in concert with traditional methods, like in-person interviews and due diligence. The tools are designed to help investors source deals, and track dozens of companies at any given time.

The company is already working with a handful of venture firms, including OMERS Ventures, the investment arm of one of Canada’s largest pension funds. “They feel they need to be more data-driven to compete with the guys in California,” Piron explained.

Piron pulls up a demo to demonstrate how it’s done, a few weeks prior to the company launch at the Wired Money conference in London. Perform a simple search for a private tech company on Bright Sun, and browse a company profile. Investors can immediately gain access to relevant information, including the amount of funding that the startup has raised to date, its burn rate (typically a best guess), approximately how much money is in the bank, a prediction of whether the startup is currently looking for funding, backgrounds of the founders, and more.

Bright Sun is plugged into a variety of data sources, including CapitalIQ, CrunchBase, AngelList, Appstores, Alexa rankings, company head counts on LinkedIn, press articles, and sites that the government use to track private companies, like CompanyHouse.

The system will alert investors if a drastic change has occurred, so they can move quickly. For instance, it might be worth knowing if a portion of the team is suddenly fired or laid off, or a startup receives 100,000 downloads of its new app in the space of a week.

Piron has yet to determine which of the signals are strongest, but hopes to get a better gauge on the key indicators of startup success over time. I suggest that he take a look at a Bay Area research project called “Startup Genome.” By analyzing data-sources, the researchers found that investors have a better shot at making a return if they bet on larger teams, and companies that have shifted product focus more than once — but not more than three times. Read more on the results here.

Bright Sun’s technology has proven most useful to smaller venture firms or non-U.S. based funds. To market the beta product, Piron and his cofounders are relying on their personal connections from the finance world.

In future, they may come up against strong competition from MatterMark, an Andreessen Horowitz backed startup that operates under the tagline “big data meets venture capital” (hot tip: if you’re interested in startups, it’s worth subscribing to the the free newsletter). Likewise, AngelList helps investors curate opportunities, and 500 Startups’ Paul Singh is working on a startups investing and insights toolset dubbed Dashboard.io.

Bright Sun is a privately-funded effort to date, but Piron and team are considering raising a small round of investment so they can expand the product and team.


Filed under: Enterprise
    


Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Bright Sun Group’s data analysis can help investors find ‘diamonds in the rough’ (exclusive)

June 28th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Venture capitalists can no longer rely on outdated statistics and gut feelings.

As we reported, a Moneyball-style revolution is taking place in Silicon Valley, and other tech hubs around the world. Prestigious venture capital firms are investing in data science teams and quantitative tools to track the private markets. The younger firms are going one step further by creating an entire investment thesis around data.

“Algorithms will be the heart and soul of due diligence — it’s not just a sanity-check mechanism,” said Matt Oguz, the managing partner of new investment firm Palo Alto Venture Science. “It’s the only way to cut through human bias.”

A group of three friends, self-proclaimed “ex-Hedge Fund quant nerds,” have been tracking this shift for years. In the height of the recession, they decided to quit their steady corporate jobs to launch Bright Sun Group. The goal is to help investors find the “diamond in the rough” investment, and not just fight for the attention of the trendiest startups. (See herd mentality.”)

Data-driven investing is a hotly disputed topic in Silicon Valley. Venture capitalists like David Hornik believe that algorithms are a non-starter. “If you are a good venture investor, you are better off applying your own judgment than you are collecting data on how everyone else invests and performs,” Hornik told me.

Cofounder Stephen Piron is aware of the discord, but believes it’s only a matter of time before investors embrace the data. “There has been a sea change [and] things are shifting very quickly,” he explained.

We meet at a coffee shop in London to discuss how to track private companies. Piron, who formerly worked on the analytics team at Man Investments and ITG Canada, has been heads down building the technology for a number of years. ”We’re living in a world where even the discretionary funds have some kind of electronic component,” said Piron.

Piron doesn’t believe that Bright Sun’s technology will replace human investors entirely. But it can be used in concert with traditional methods, like in-person interviews and due diligence. The tools are designed to help investors source deals, and track dozens of companies at any given time.

The company is already working with a handful of venture firms, including OMERS Ventures, the investment arm of one of Canada’s largest pension funds. “They feel they need to be more data-driven to compete with the guys in California,” Piron explained.

Piron pulls up a demo to demonstrate how it’s done, a few weeks prior to the company launch at the Wired Money conference in London. Perform a simple search for a private tech company on Bright Sun, and browse a company profile. Investors can immediately gain access to relevant information, including the amount of funding that the startup has raised to date, its burn rate (typically a best guess), approximately how much money is in the bank, a prediction of whether the startup is currently looking for funding, backgrounds of the founders, and more.

Bright Sun is plugged into a variety of data sources, including CapitalIQ, CrunchBase, AngelList, Appstores, Alexa rankings, company head counts on LinkedIn, press articles, and sites that the government use to track private companies, like CompanyHouse.

The system will alert investors if a drastic change has occurred, so they can move quickly. For instance, it might be worth knowing if a portion of the team is suddenly fired or laid off, or a startup receives 100,000 downloads of its new app in the space of a week.

Piron has yet to determine which of the signals are strongest, but hopes to get a better gauge on the key indicators of startup success over time. I suggest that he take a look at a Bay Area research project called “Startup Genome.” By analyzing data-sources, the researchers found that investors have a better shot at making a return if they bet on larger teams, and companies that have shifted product focus more than once — but not more than three times. Read more on the results here.

Bright Sun’s technology has proven most useful to smaller venture firms or non-U.S. based funds. To market the beta product, Piron and his cofounders are relying on their personal connections from the finance world.

In future, they may come up against strong competition from MatterMark, an Andreessen Horowitz backed startup that operates under the tagline “big data meets venture capital” (hot tip: if you’re interested in startups, it’s worth subscribing to the the free newsletter). Likewise, AngelList helps investors curate opportunities, and 500 Startups’ Paul Singh is working on a startups investing and insights toolset dubbed Dashboard.io.

Bright Sun is a privately-funded effort to date, but Piron and team are considering raising a small round of investment so they can expand the product and team.


Filed under: Enterprise
    


Tags: , , , , , , ,

Timesheet company Replicon raises $20M after 17 years without outside funding

June 28th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Replicon has raised $20 million in funding, taking outside capital for time first time in its 17 year history.

Replicon provides cloud-based timesheet software. It offers solutions for tracking business time and expenses. The platform has tools to manage project time and cost, client billing, attendance, time-off, and expenses, as well as a cloud-connected punch clock device, to keep businesses organized and their operations transparent,

It was founded in 1996 by a husband-and-wife team and is now used by 7,800 organizations around the world and serves 1.5 million people around the world. Clients include international corporations like HP, FedEx, Xerox, and General Mills, as well as smaller organizations.

Over the past few years, demand for cloud-based enterprise tools has soared and businesses of all sizes are traded their inefficient, paper-based time/cost tracking systems for software solutions. Replicon experienced strong growth and expects that it will grow by 60 to 80 percent by 2015. Founders Raj Narayanaswamy and Lakshmi Raj decided to raise venture capital to meet this demand and scale accordingly.

Emergence Capital Partners and The Social + Capital Partnership led this round. Chamath Palihapitiya of S+C said in a statement that this financing will also support product development, as Replicon explores new partnerships and integrations with outside products and services.

“With this growing interdependence, there needs to be a common platform that can help companies deal with increasingly complex business needs and labor practices,” he said “Replicon is poised to become this platform for the future.”

Timetracking may not be sexy, but it is important, and something that every business deals with in one form or another. Replicon has offices in San Mateo, Calgary, Bangalore, and Toronto.


Filed under: Business, Cloud, Deals, Enterprise
    


Tags: , , , ,

Timesheet company Replicon raises $20M after 17 years without outside funding

June 28th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Replicon has raised $20 million in funding, taking outside capital for time first time in its 17 year history.

Replicon provides cloud-based timesheet software. It offers solutions for tracking business time and expenses. The platform has tools to manage project time and cost, client billing, attendance, time-off, and expenses, as well as a cloud-connected punch clock device, to keep businesses organized and their operations transparent,

It was founded in 1996 by a husband-and-wife team and is now used by 7,800 organizations around the world and serves 1.5 million people around the world. Clients include international corporations like HP, FedEx, Xerox, and General Mills, as well as smaller organizations.

Over the past few years, demand for cloud-based enterprise tools has soared and businesses of all sizes are traded their inefficient, paper-based time/cost tracking systems for software solutions. Replicon experienced strong growth and expects that it will grow by 60 to 80 percent by 2015. Founders Raj Narayanaswamy and Lakshmi Raj decided to raise venture capital to meet this demand and scale accordingly.

Emergence Capital Partners and The Social + Capital Partnership led this round. Chamath Palihapitiya of S+C said in a statement that this financing will also support product development, as Replicon explores new partnerships and integrations with outside products and services.

“With this growing interdependence, there needs to be a common platform that can help companies deal with increasingly complex business needs and labor practices,” he said “Replicon is poised to become this platform for the future.”

Timetracking may not be sexy, but it is important, and something that every business deals with in one form or another. Replicon has offices in San Mateo, Calgary, Bangalore, and Toronto.


Filed under: Business, Cloud, Deals, Enterprise
    


Tags: , , , , , , ,

Timesheet company Replicon raises $20M after 17 years without outside funding

June 28th, 2013 No comments
MobileBeat 2013
July 9-10, 2013
San Francisco, CA
Tickets On Sale Now

Replicon has raised $20 million in funding, taking outside capital for time first time in its 17 year history.

Replicon provides cloud-based timesheet software. It offers solutions for tracking business time and expenses. The platform has tools to manage project time and cost, client billing, attendance, time-off, and expenses, as well as a cloud-connected punch clock device, to keep businesses organized and their operations transparent,

It was founded in 1996 by a husband-and-wife team and is now used by 7,800 organizations around the world and serves 1.5 million people around the world. Clients include international corporations like HP, FedEx, Xerox, and General Mills, as well as smaller organizations.

Over the past few years, demand for cloud-based enterprise tools has soared and businesses of all sizes are traded their inefficient, paper-based time/cost tracking systems for software solutions. Replicon experienced strong growth and expects that it will grow by 60 to 80 percent by 2015. Founders Raj Narayanaswamy and Lakshmi Raj decided to raise venture capital to meet this demand and scale accordingly.

Emergence Capital Partners and The Social + Capital Partnership led this round. Chamath Palihapitiya of S+C said in a statement that this financing will also support product development, as Replicon explores new partnerships and integrations with outside products and services.

“With this growing interdependence, there needs to be a common platform that can help companies deal with increasingly complex business needs and labor practices,” he said “Replicon is poised to become this platform for the future.”

Timetracking may not be sexy, but it is important, and something that every business deals with in one form or another. Replicon has offices in San Mateo, Calgary, Bangalore, and Toronto.


Filed under: Business, Cloud, Deals, Enterprise
    


Tags: , , , , , , ,

GameSpasm is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache