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Posts Tagged ‘asia’

At our current rate of progress, IPv6 will be fully implemented on May 10, 2048

June 7th, 2013 No comments

origin_2263128429IPv6 is more efficient, more secure, and more mobile-friendly than IPv4. And in an exploding ecosystem of internet-capable smart devices which IPv4′s 4.3 billion addresses already can’t cover, IPv6 has enough IP addresses for every single atom on the surface of the earth … plus another 100 or so earth-like planets.

So, a day after the third annual IPv6 day, why aren’t we adopting IPv6 faster?

If anyone should know, Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare, should have a pretty good idea. CloudFlare, a content delivery network,  moves more data and pushes more pageviews to more people around the globe than Facebook — 150 billion pageviews a month.

Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare
Source: LinkedIn

Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare

I talked to Prince about IPv6, CloudFlare, and the current state of adoption. Unfortunately, it pretty much sucks.

“The good news is that from January 1 to today, we’re seeing 26.5% growth in IPv6 usage,” Prince told me yesterday. “The bad news is that it’s still just 1.5 percent of all requests. If we keep growing at this rate, then it will take until May 10 of 2048 before we can finally retire IPv4.”

Prince is hoping that the growth will not be steady-state but exponential, accelerating through the adoption curve. Even if that happens, however, CloudFlare predicts that full IPv6 adoption would take seven years, until January 2020.

Not impressive.

“IP” is internet protocol, the protocol that gives an address and location to every internet-capable device. The current iteration, version 4, has its roots in 1980, around the time when people like Ken Olsen, founder of Digital Equipment Corp, still said stupid stuff like: “There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home.” Now of course, everyone has five or six, including one in their pocket, another in their TV, on for the sofa, another hooked up to their TV, a couple in their cars, and a few big ones lying around in various places throughout their homes on large flat surfaces with chairs.

IP version 6 was born in 1996, give or take, and offers 340 trillion trillion trillion unique identifiers — more than we could ever conceivably need. And it offers built-in multicasting, better tracking (which could simultaneously make the internet both more secure and less private), more efficient processing by routers, and support for larger packet sizes, which could speed deliver of large multi-media objects such as Netflix movies.

Google visualizes IPv6 versus IPv4
Source: Google

Google visualizes IPv6 versus IPv4

So it’s definitely better. So why the long delays in implementation?

According to the Internet Society, much of that is due to the fact that technologies like NAT (network address translation) have allowed many ISPs and companies to use a single IP address for many machines. But the biggest problem is that IPv6 requires time and investment, and since there are some workarounds that have done the job until now, many organizations aren’t willing to lay out cash for no clear or immediate return.

For its part, CloudFlare says it’s there to support customers whichever way they go.

“If we’re not the largest provider of IPv6 web, then we’re close — we have over a million sites that are IPv6 enabled,” Prince told me. “But we’ve continued to roll out a dual-stack solution and let customers choose. That’s the real driver of growth … especially the U.S. government.”

IPv6 vs IPv4
Source: Wikipedia

IPv6 vs IPv4

Interestingly, IPv4 is turning into a growth driver for CloudFlare. Asian ISPs, who can’t get new IP addresses on IPv4 anymore since Asia ran out two years ago, are turning to CloudFlare to host on IPv6, and then make sites available via CloudFlare’s IPv4 capability as well. That’s mostly for small, personal sites, but Prince takes some satisfaction in enabling budding web builders:

“We’re helping preserve $9.99 hosting, which is where a lot of good things start,” he says.

Even more interesting, however, CloudFlare — which protects sites from hacking attacks — is starting to notice IPv6-only hack attacks. While historically only a tiny fraction of hacking attacks, .3 percent, originated from IPv6 vectors, that’s taken a sharp uptick lately. Which shows that even though IPv6 can be more secure than IPv4, DDOS attacks, which rely on botnets of compromised PCs which are hacked, drafted, and used as pawns by hackers to attack other sites, still work. In other words, even if you know exactly where the attack is coming from, that doesn’t always help in deflecting it.

The real driver, however, is that hackers have discovered something about legacy security products.

“We speculate that some attackers have discovered that a lot of legacy security products assume an IPv4 world,” Prince explains. “They’re doing IP address blacklisting, which doesn’t work in the IPv6 world. Since a lot of the security products were not designed for IPv6, they don’t know what to do, and just pass the traffic on … so IPv6 becomes a way of by-passing legacy security products.”

The biggest IPv6 attack that CloudFlare saw, just two weeks ago, was a 3 GB/second DDOS (distributed denial of service) attack, focused on CloudFlare itself, not one of its customers.

I guess the one good thing about hackers starting to use IPv6 is that it’s at least one sign of increased life in the protocol.

Which, frankly, is almost a good sign right now.

photo credit: fgm.group via photopin cc


Filed under: Business, Cloud, Dev, Mobile, Security

SAP Startup FocusBig Data and Predictive/Real-time Analytics startups: Are you looking to jumpstart development & accelerate market traction? Sign up for the SAP Startup Focus program to receive technology, support, resources and community to help you develop new applications on SAP HANA, a cutting edge database platform. Get started here, and enter promo code “VB2013″ on the form.
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

At our current rate of progress, IPv6 will be fully implemented on May 10, 2048

June 7th, 2013 No comments

origin_2263128429IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) is more efficient, more secure, and more mobile-friendly than IPv4. And in an exploding ecosystem of Internet-capable smart devices which IPv4′s 4.3 billion addresses already can’t cover, IPv6 has enough IP addresses for every single atom on the surface of the Earth … plus another 100 or so Earth-like planets.

So, a day after the third annual IPv6 day, why aren’t we adopting IPv6 faster?

If anyone should know, CloudFlare CEO Matthew Prince should have a pretty good idea. A content delivery network, CloudFlare moves more data and pushes more pageviews to more people around the globe than Facebook — 150 billion pageviews a month.

Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare
Source: LinkedIn

Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare.

I talked to Prince about IPv6, CloudFlare, and the current state of adoption. Unfortunately, it pretty much sucks.

“The good news is that from Jan. 1 to today, we’re seeing 26.5 percent growth in IPv6 usage,” Prince told me yesterday. “The bad news is that it’s still just 1.5 percent of all requests. If we keep growing at this rate, then it will take until May 10 of 2048 before we can finally retire IPv4.”

Prince is hoping that the growth will not be steady-state but exponential, accelerating through the adoption curve. Even if that happens, however, CloudFlare predicts that full IPv6 adoption would take seven years, until January 2020.

Not impressive.

“IP” is Internet Protocol, which gives an address and location to every Internet-capable device. The current iteration, version 4, has its roots in 1980, around the time when people like Ken Olsen, the founder of Digital Equipment Corp, still said stupid stuff like: “There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home.” Now of course, everyone has five or six, including one in their pocket, another in their TV, on for the sofa, another hooked up to their TV, a couple in their cars, and a few big ones lying around in various places throughout their homes on large flat surfaces with chairs.

IP version 6 was born in 1996, give or take, and offers 340 trillion trillion trillion unique identifiers — more than we could ever conceivably need. And it offers built-in multicasting, better tracking (which could simultaneously make the internet both more secure and less private), more efficient processing by routers, and support for larger packet sizes, which could speed deliver of large multimedia objects such as Netflix movies.

Google visualizes IPv6 versus IPv4
Source: Google

Google visualizes IPv6 versus IPv4

So it’s definitely better. So why the long delays in implementation?

According to the Internet Society, much of that is because technologies like NAT (network address translation) have enabled many ISPs and companies to use a single IP address for many machines. But the biggest problem is that IPv6 requires time and investment, and since there are some workarounds that have done the job until now, many organizations aren’t willing to lay out cash for no clear or immediate return.

For its part, CloudFlare says it’s there to support customers whichever way they go.

“If we’re not the largest provider of IPv6 web, then we’re close — we have over a million sites that are IPv6 enabled,” Prince told me. “But we’ve continued to roll out a dual-stack solution and let customers choose. That’s the real driver of growth … especially the U.S. government.”

IPv6 vs IPv4
Source: Wikipedia

IPv6 vs IPv4.

Interestingly, IPv4 is turning into a growth driver for CloudFlare. Asian ISPs, who can’t get new IP addresses on IPv4 anymore since Asia ran out two years ago, are turning to CloudFlare to host on IPv6, and then make sites available via CloudFlare’s IPv4 capability as well. That’s mostly for small, personal sites, but Prince takes some satisfaction in enabling budding web builders:

“We’re helping preserve $9.99 hosting, which is where a lot of good things start,” he says.

Even more interesting, however, CloudFlare — which protects sites from hacking attacks — is starting to notice IPv6-only hack attacks. While historically only a tiny fraction of hacking attacks, .3 percent, originated from IPv6 vectors, that’s taken a sharp uptick lately. This shows that even though IPv6 can be more secure than IPv4, DDOS attacks, which rely on botnets of compromised PCs which are hacked, drafted, and used as pawns by hackers to attack other sites, still work. In other words, even if you know exactly where the attack is coming from, that doesn’t always help in deflecting it.

The real driver, however, is that hackers have discovered something about legacy security products.

“We speculate that some attackers have discovered that a lot of legacy security products assume an IPv4 world,” Prince explains. “They’re doing IP address blacklisting, which doesn’t work in the IPv6 world. Since a lot of the security products were not designed for IPv6, they don’t know what to do, and just pass the traffic on … so IPv6 becomes a way of by-passing legacy security products.”

The biggest IPv6 attack that CloudFlare saw, just two weeks ago, was a 3GB/second DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack, focused on CloudFlare itself, not one of its customers.

I guess the one good thing about hackers starting to use IPv6 is that it’s at least one sign of increased life in the protocol.

Which, frankly, is almost a good sign right now.

Image credit: fgm.group via photopin cc


Filed under: Business, Cloud, Dev, Mobile, Security

SAP Startup FocusBig Data and Predictive/Real-time Analytics startups: Are you looking to jumpstart development & accelerate market traction? Sign up for the SAP Startup Focus program to receive technology, support, resources and community to help you develop new applications on SAP HANA, a cutting edge database platform. Get started here, and enter promo code “VB2013″ on the form.
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

At our current rate of progress, IPv6 will be fully implemented on May 10, 2048

June 7th, 2013 No comments

origin_2263128429IPv6 is more efficient, more secure, and more mobile-friendly than IPv4. And in an exploding ecosystem of internet-capable smart devices which IPv4′s 4.3 billion addresses already can’t cover, IPv6 has enough IP addresses for every single atom on the surface of the earth … plus another 100 or so earth-like planets.

So, a day after the third annual IPv6 day, why aren’t we adopting IPv6 faster?

If anyone should know, Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare, should have a pretty good idea. CloudFlare, a content delivery network,  moves more data and pushes more pageviews to more people around the globe than Facebook — 150 billion pageviews a month.

Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare
Source: LinkedIn

Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare

I talked to Prince about IPv6, CloudFlare, and the current state of adoption. Unfortunately, it pretty much sucks.

“The good news is that from January 1 to today, we’re seeing 26.5% growth in IPv6 usage,” Prince told me yesterday. “The bad news is that it’s still just 1.5 percent of all requests. If we keep growing at this rate, then it will take until May 10 of 2048 before we can finally retire IPv4.”

Prince is hoping that the growth will not be steady-state but exponential, accelerating through the adoption curve. Even if that happens, however, CloudFlare predicts that full IPv6 adoption would take seven years, until January 2020.

Not impressive.

“IP” is internet protocol, the protocol that gives an address and location to every internet-capable device. The current iteration, version 4, has its roots in 1980, around the time when people like Ken Olsen, founder of Digital Equipment Corp, still said stupid stuff like: “There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home.” Now of course, everyone has five or six, including one in their pocket, another in their TV, on for the sofa, another hooked up to their TV, a couple in their cars, and a few big ones lying around in various places throughout their homes on large flat surfaces with chairs.

IP version 6 was born in 1996, give or take, and offers 340 trillion trillion trillion unique identifiers — more than we could ever conceivably need. And it offers built-in multicasting, better tracking (which could simultaneously make the internet both more secure and less private), more efficient processing by routers, and support for larger packet sizes, which could speed deliver of large multi-media objects such as Netflix movies.

Google visualizes IPv6 versus IPv4
Source: Google

Google visualizes IPv6 versus IPv4

So it’s definitely better. So why the long delays in implementation?

According to the Internet Society, much of that is due to the fact that technologies like NAT (network address translation) have allowed many ISPs and companies to use a single IP address for many machines. But the biggest problem is that IPv6 requires time and investment, and since there are some workarounds that have done the job until now, many organizations aren’t willing to lay out cash for no clear or immediate return.

For its part, CloudFlare says it’s there to support customers whichever way they go.

“If we’re not the largest provider of IPv6 web, then we’re close — we have over a million sites that are IPv6 enabled,” Prince told me. “But we’ve continued to roll out a dual-stack solution and let customers choose. That’s the real driver of growth … especially the U.S. government.”

IPv6 vs IPv4
Source: Wikipedia

IPv6 vs IPv4

Interestingly, IPv4 is turning into a growth driver for CloudFlare. Asian ISPs, who can’t get new IP addresses on IPv4 anymore since Asia ran out two years ago, are turning to CloudFlare to host on IPv6, and then make sites available via CloudFlare’s IPv4 capability as well. That’s mostly for small, personal sites, but Prince takes some satisfaction in enabling budding web builders:

“We’re helping preserve $9.99 hosting, which is where a lot of good things start,” he says.

Even more interesting, however, CloudFlare — which protects sites from hacking attacks — is starting to notice IPv6-only hack attacks. While historically only a tiny fraction of hacking attacks, .3 percent, originated from IPv6 vectors, that’s taken a sharp uptick lately. Which shows that even though IPv6 can be more secure than IPv4, DDOS attacks, which rely on botnets of compromised PCs which are hacked, drafted, and used as pawns by hackers to attack other sites, still work. In other words, even if you know exactly where the attack is coming from, that doesn’t always help in deflecting it.

The real driver, however, is that hackers have discovered something about legacy security products.

“We speculate that some attackers have discovered that a lot of legacy security products assume an IPv4 world,” Prince explains. “They’re doing IP address blacklisting, which doesn’t work in the IPv6 world. Since a lot of the security products were not designed for IPv6, they don’t know what to do, and just pass the traffic on … so IPv6 becomes a way of by-passing legacy security products.”

The biggest IPv6 attack that CloudFlare saw, just two weeks ago, was a 3 GB/second DDOS (distributed denial of service) attack, focused on CloudFlare itself, not one of its customers.

I guess the one good thing about hackers starting to use IPv6 is that it’s at least one sign of increased life in the protocol.

Which, frankly, is almost a good sign right now.

photo credit: fgm.group via photopin cc


Filed under: Business, Cloud, Dev, Mobile, Security

SAP Startup FocusBig Data and Predictive/Real-time Analytics startups: Are you looking to jumpstart development & accelerate market traction? Sign up for the SAP Startup Focus program to receive technology, support, resources and community to help you develop new applications on SAP HANA, a cutting edge database platform. Get started here, and enter promo code “VB2013″ on the form.
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Twitter paints the world with your geo-tagged tweets

May 31st, 2013 No comments

Europe

Twitter’s visual insights team is obsessed with the patterns that emerge from the seeming chaos of random people tweeting random things in random places.

But, as an analysis of all the billions of geo-tagged tweets since 2009 shows, there’s nothing random about it.

Twitter plotted all geo-tagged tweets for key global locations on a map. And the result is big data come to life — and a vision of how we move, where we live, and where we congregate in the largest numbers:

Not surprisingly, the tweet patterns in most cities are defined by their physical geography.

New York, for instance, shows a clearly-defined island of Manhattan. Tokyo clearly shows the concentration of the city and its density, and the relative vacuum of Tokyo Harbor. San Francisco shows the city’s two main bridges peeling off from the peninsula. The tweet-map of Istanbul clearly shows the Bosporus, dividing Europe and Asia.

And Moscow is stunning in its seemingly master-planned circularity, with ring roads ringing the Russian capital at ever-increasing distances.

One map the Twitter data team highlighted is the map of Europe, which is fascinating not just for the continental patterns it reveals, but, as Twitter engineer Miguel Rios says, ”because it shows all the maritime traffic from different cities and countries.”

After all, tweeting is not limited to the ground.

Image credits: Twitter


Filed under: Big Data, Business, New York, Social
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Twitter paints the world with your geo-tagged tweets

May 31st, 2013 No comments

Europe

Twitter’s visual insights team is obsessed with the patterns that emerge from the seeming chaos of random people tweeting random things in random places.

But, as an analysis of all the billions of geo-tagged tweets since 2009 shows, there’s nothing random about it.

Twitter plotted all geo-tagged tweets for key global locations on a map. And the result is big data come to life — and a vision of how we move, where we live, and where we congregate in the largest numbers:

Not surprisingly, the tweet patterns in most cities are defined by their physical geography.

New York, for instance, shows a clearly-defined island of Manhattan. Tokyo clearly shows the concentration of the city and its density, and the relative vacuum of Tokyo Harbor. San Francisco shows the city’s two main bridges peeling off from the peninsula. The tweet-map of Istanbul clearly shows the Bosporus, dividing Europe and Asia.

And Moscow is stunning in its seemingly master-planned circularity, with ring roads ringing the Russian capital at ever-increasing distances.

One map the Twitter data team highlighted is the map of Europe, which is fascinating not just for the continental patterns it reveals, but, as Twitter engineer Miguel Rios says, ”because it shows all the maritime traffic from different cities and countries.”

After all, tweeting is not limited to the ground.

Image credits: Twitter


Filed under: Big Data, Business, New York, Social
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fashion & beauty startup Zalora scores $100M investment to grow in Southeast Asia

May 22nd, 2013 No comments

fashion-beautyZalora, the Zappos-like fashion and beauty store for Southeast Asia, announced this morning that it has closed a $100 million financing round.

That’s a lot of lipstick and high heels.

Zalora focuses on 10 countries in Asia: Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. The year-old startup says it has already achieved “annualized double-digit million USD revenues.”

“Our company is one of the fastest growing e-commerce companies in Southeast Asia and has bright prospects,” said managing director Michele Ferrario. “It is an honor for us that investors of such great repute have invested into an e-commerce company as young as Zalora”

zalora

It is indeed an honor when a year-old startup with two or three million dollars in annualized revenue scores a $100 million investment. And it’s an unusual honor as well. But there’s method behind the madness.

The investment was secured by the German holding company that owns Zalora, Rocket Internet, which claims to be “the largest, fastest and most successful international online venture builder.” Founded by the infamous Samwer brothers — who Jason Calacanis has called “despicable thieves” —  its modus operandi has been to take successful models from American startups and apply them globally.

Genius, perhaps, if not very original. And very, very successful.

Rocket Internet sold Groupon clone CityDeal to Groupon for $126 million in 2010 and eBay clone Alando to eBay for $50 million, among many other lucrative deals. That history is undoubtedly part of what led the investment group, led by Summit Partners, Investment AB Kinnevik, and the Verlinvest and Tengelmann Group, to participate in this $100 million round.

Rocket Internet's impressive portfolio of companies
Source: Rocket Internet

Rocket Internet’s impressive portfolio of companies

A big chunk, 25 percent, of Zalora’s revenue comes from mobile commerce, and the company says its app is the top lifestyle app in all the countries it serves, and the top app overall for Singapore, Malaysia and Vietnam.

In other words, Rocket Ventures saw an opportunity to take a big slice of an emerging market, and is moving rapidly — and with massive investment — to own the space.

The capital will be used, Zalora said, to scale up operations and grow the number of local and international brands it carries.

The company has just delivered its millionth order.

photo credit: AehoHikaruki via photopin cc


Filed under: Business, Deals, Entrepreneur, Lifestyle, Mobile
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fashion & beauty startup Zalora scores $100M investment to grow in south-east Asia

May 22nd, 2013 No comments

fashion-beautyZalora, the Zappo’s-like fashion and beauty store for south-east Asia, announced this morning that it has closed a $100 million financing round.

That’s a lot of lipstick and high heels.

Zalora focuses on 10 countries in Asia: Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. The year-old startup says it has already achieved “annualized double-digit million USD revenues.”

“Our company is one of the fastest growing e-commerce companies in South-East Asia and has bright prospects,” said Michele Ferrario, Managing Director. “It is an honor for us that investors of such great repute have invested into an e-commerce company as young as ZALORA.”

zalora

It is indeed an honor when a year-old startup with two or three million dollars in annualized revenue scores a $100 million investment. An unusual honor, as well. But there’s method behind the madness.

The investment was secured by the German holding company that owns Zalora, Rocket Internet, which claims to be “the largest, fastest and most successful international online venture builder.” Founded by the infamous Samwer brothers — who Jason Calacanis has called “despicable thieves” —  its modus operandi has been to take successful models from American startups and apply them globally.

Genius, perhaps, if not very original. And very, very successful.

Rocket Internet sold Groupon clone CityDeal to Groupon for $126 in 2010 and eBay clone Alando to eBay for $50 million, among many other lucrative deals. That history is undoubtedly part of what led the investment group, led by Summit Partners, Investment AB Kinnevik, and the Verlinvest and Tengelmann Group, to participate in this $100 million round.

Rocket Internet's impressive portfolio of companies
Source: Rocket Internet

Rocket Internet’s impressive portfolio of companies

A big chunk, 25 percent, of Zalora’s revenue comes from mobile commerce, and the company says its app is the top lifestyle app in all the countries it serves, and the top app overall for Singapore, Malaysia and Vietnam.

In other words, Rocket Ventures saw an opportunity to take a big slice of an emerging market, and is moving rapidly — and with massive investment — to own the space.

The capital will be used, Zalora said, to scale up operations and grow the number of local and international brands it carries.

The company has just delivered its millionth order.

photo credit: AehoHikaruki via photopin cc


Filed under: Business, Deals, Entrepreneur, Lifestyle, Mobile
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fashion & beauty startup Zalora scores $100M investment to grow in south-east Asia

May 22nd, 2013 No comments

fashion-beautyZalora, the Zappo’s-like fashion and beauty store for south-east Asia, announced this morning that it has closed a $100 million financing round.

That’s a lot of lipstick and high heels.

Zalora focuses on 10 countries in Asia: Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. The year-old startup says it has already achieved “annualized double-digit million USD revenues.”

“Our company is one of the fastest growing e-commerce companies in South-East Asia and has bright prospects,” said Michele Ferrario, Managing Director. “It is an honor for us that investors of such great repute have invested into an e-commerce company as young as ZALORA.”

zalora

It is indeed an honor when a year-old startup with two or three million dollars in annualized revenue scores a $100 million investment. An unusual honor, as well. But there’s method behind the madness.

The investment was secured by the German holding company that owns Zalora, Rocket Internet, which claims to be “the largest, fastest and most successful international online venture builder.” Founded by the infamous Samwer brothers — who Jason Calacanis has called “despicable thieves” —  its modus operandi has been to take successful models from American startups and apply them globally.

Genius, perhaps, if not very original. And very, very successful.

Rocket Internet sold Groupon clone CityDeal to Groupon for $126 in 2010 and eBay clone Alando to eBay for $50 million, among many other lucrative deals. That history is undoubtedly part of what led the investment group, led by Summit Partners, Investment AB Kinnevik, and the Verlinvest and Tengelmann Group, to participate in this $100 million round.

Rocket Internet's impressive portfolio of companies
Source: Rocket Internet

Rocket Internet’s impressive portfolio of companies

A big chunk, 25 percent, of Zalora’s revenue comes from mobile commerce, and the company says its app is the top lifestyle app in all the countries it serves, and the top app overall for Singapore, Malaysia and Vietnam.

In other words, Rocket Ventures saw an opportunity to take a big slice of an emerging market, and is moving rapidly — and with massive investment — to own the space.

The capital will be used, Zalora said, to scale up operations and grow the number of local and international brands it carries.

The company has just delivered its millionth order.

photo credit: AehoHikaruki via photopin cc


Filed under: Business, Deals, Entrepreneur, Lifestyle, Mobile
    


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Reverse globalization: How we took our startup from India to Asia to Europe to global

April 29th, 2013 No comments

Naveen Tewari is the CEO and founder of mobile advertising company InMobi.

When I co-founded InMobi in 2007, we took a novel “east-to-west” approach to our growth, starting in India before moving into other developing markets, then finally into more traditional “Western” markets as well.

Because this method of expansion didn’t have any precursors, and mobile advertising was at the time still a very new field, we had to chart our own course and set our own example. And as a corollary, we would have to deal with a number of challenges as we discovered that the mobile landscape was different in each geography we entered, and learn to quickly recover from mistakes.

I’d like to talk about some of the challenges we faced and how we dealt with them, as I believe it will be of relevance to other businesses that are trying to build a global footprint:

Learning while doing

Because we were experimenting with a new business model, we often had to rely on intuition as we calculated our next moves. When you are trying to expand across multiple geographies at a rapid pace, you are bound to slip, and we were no exception. For example, our first forays out of India into other geographies, starting with Indonesia and South Africa, did not yield initial success, and we could not gain a strong foothold in the market. Our lack of understanding of the ways in which brands, advertisers, and consumers communicated and interacted in these markets, and incorrect hypotheses about the overall advertising ecosystem, led to delayed revenue streams. But we learned how the ecosystem worked and began expanding our reach in these emerging markets.

Likewise, when we had to extend the capabilities of our platform to serve multiple regions/countries, we almost ran the risk of jeopardizing existing business in India by shifting focus away from it.

We learned quickly from such wrong moves, and this helped us templatize our forays into new countries, and that is the key takeaway:

An experiential learning approach works well if you can recover from your mistakes quickly and identify patterns and models from within a few iterations.

Recalibrating world view frequently

Working with an evolving technology and business model, and one that had numerous dependencies on the moves of key players in the mobile device and platform platform markets, brought with it another set of challenges: frequently making informed decisions on the roadmap of our technology platform, which was the pivot of our business.

In addition, our geographic expansion plan also compelled us to be agile and flexible.  Once we had tasted initial success, we laid out a plan to simultaneously expand in Southeast Asia (Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore), Western Europe and Japan. Each of these markets had its own characteristics and was very different from one another. Western Europe was developed, and so was Japan, but the latter is a contained market with little in common with the European market. The emerging markets, on the other hand, were evolving and needed a totally different approach.

Clearly, we had to tailor our approach to suit each market, and this meant that we literally had to revisit our assumptions and plans every quarter.

In all of the above, our overall commitment to speed — in thinking and in action — helped, and our approach of trying out and making course corrections, rather than waiting and watching, stood out. To me, the key takeaway from this experience is staying committed to a strategy for the future, while adapting the tactics to the present.

Shaping Management Mindset

While the first two sets of challenges emanated from the market, the third was more internal and had to do with adopting the right mindset.

As a startup with global ambitions, we had several mental hurdles to cross. Learning to think big while being small was one of them. Some of us had a tendency to want to do one thing very well as opposed to developing broader competencies and skills, which is a prerequisite to build scale. Another issue was balancing our short-term needs with our long-term goals. Nowhere was it a bigger challenge than when we opened offices in new geographies and set out to hire the regional anchors. How much to pay, how long to wait for the right candidate, what profile should we opt for?  These were real questions we had to find answers for. We made a few errors of judgment here as well, like hiring candidates about whom we were not completely convinced, before we made the tough call to wait for the right candidates and pay them the right compensation.

The last thing we had to do, of course, was to transform our thinking, speaking and actions to reflect those of a truly global organization, and make the transition from being part of an “Indian” team to a cross-cultural one. This entailed creating a consistent corporate culture with frequent interactions between teams based in India and those in the other markets. By encouraging two-way travel, we ensured that teams from India understood market and cross-cultural nuances early on.

In sum, we learned to be open, introspective and aware of the consequences of your behavior and actions.

Thinking back, what allowed us to surmount the challenges we faced and mold our thinking and actions to suit the purpose was our total commitment to our vision and the excitement of creating an innovative and valuable business model.

That is the overarching message I’d like to leave you with: clarity of vision and purpose is the glue that binds a team together and acts as a lubricant to mitigate the friction caused by obstacles along the way.

For more information on InMobi’s East-to-West strategy, see Naveen Tewari’s first post, here.

naveenNaveen Tewari is InMobi’s CEO and founder. He graduated from Harvard Business School and worked at Charles River Ventures and McKinsey & Company before starting InMobi. InMobi, based in Bangalore with offices in Singapore and San Francisco, currently employs more than 900 people and has taken $216 million to date in venture funding.

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc


Filed under: Business, Entrepreneur, Mobile, VentureBeat
    


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Reverse globalization: How we took our startup from India to Asia to Europe to global

April 29th, 2013 No comments

Naveen Tewari is the CEO and founder of mobile advertising company InMobi.

When I co-founded InMobi in 2007, we took a novel “east-to-west” approach to our growth, starting in India before moving into other developing markets, then finally into more traditional “Western” markets as well.

Because this method of expansion didn’t have any precursors, and mobile advertising was at the time still a very new field, we had to chart our own course and set our own example. And as a corollary, we would have to deal with a number of challenges as we discovered that the mobile landscape was different in each geography we entered, and learn to quickly recover from mistakes.

I’d like to talk about some of the challenges we faced and how we dealt with them, as I believe it will be of relevance to other businesses that are trying to build a global footprint:

Learning while doing

Because we were experimenting with a new business model, we often had to rely on intuition as we calculated our next moves. When you are trying to expand across multiple geographies at a rapid pace, you are bound to slip, and we were no exception. For example, our first forays out of India into other geographies, starting with Indonesia and South Africa, did not yield initial success, and we could not gain a strong foothold in the market. Our lack of understanding of the ways in which brands, advertisers, and consumers communicated and interacted in these markets, and incorrect hypotheses about the overall advertising ecosystem, led to delayed revenue streams. But we learned how the ecosystem worked and began expanding our reach in these emerging markets.

Likewise, when we had to extend the capabilities of our platform to serve multiple regions/countries, we almost ran the risk of jeopardizing existing business in India by shifting focus away from it.

We learned quickly from such wrong moves, and this helped us templatize our forays into new countries, and that is the key takeaway:

An experiential learning approach works well if you can recover from your mistakes quickly and identify patterns and models from within a few iterations.

Recalibrating world view frequently

Working with an evolving technology and business model, and one that had numerous dependencies on the moves of key players in the mobile device and platform platform markets, brought with it another set of challenges: frequently making informed decisions on the roadmap of our technology platform, which was the pivot of our business.

In addition, our geographic expansion plan also compelled us to be agile and flexible.  Once we had tasted initial success, we laid out a plan to simultaneously expand in Southeast Asia (Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore), Western Europe and Japan. Each of these markets had its own characteristics and was very different from one another. Western Europe was developed, and so was Japan, but the latter is a contained market with little in common with the European market. The emerging markets, on the other hand, were evolving and needed a totally different approach.

Clearly, we had to tailor our approach to suit each market, and this meant that we literally had to revisit our assumptions and plans every quarter.

In all of the above, our overall commitment to speed — in thinking and in action — helped, and our approach of trying out and making course corrections, rather than waiting and watching, stood out. To me, the key takeaway from this experience is staying committed to a strategy for the future, while adapting the tactics to the present.

Shaping Management Mindset

While the first two sets of challenges emanated from the market, the third was more internal and had to do with adopting the right mindset.

As a startup with global ambitions, we had several mental hurdles to cross. Learning to think big while being small was one of them. Some of us had a tendency to want to do one thing very well as opposed to developing broader competencies and skills, which is a prerequisite to build scale. Another issue was balancing our short-term needs with our long-term goals. Nowhere was it a bigger challenge than when we opened offices in new geographies and set out to hire the regional anchors. How much to pay, how long to wait for the right candidate, what profile should we opt for?  These were real questions we had to find answers for. We made a few errors of judgment here as well, like hiring candidates about whom we were not completely convinced, before we made the tough call to wait for the right candidates and pay them the right compensation.

The last thing we had to do, of course, was to transform our thinking, speaking and actions to reflect those of a truly global organization, and make the transition from being part of an “Indian” team to a cross-cultural one. This entailed creating a consistent corporate culture with frequent interactions between teams based in India and those in the other markets. By encouraging two-way travel, we ensured that teams from India understood market and cross-cultural nuances early on.

In sum, we learned to be open, introspective and aware of the consequences of your behavior and actions.

Thinking back, what allowed us to surmount the challenges we faced and mold our thinking and actions to suit the purpose was our total commitment to our vision and the excitement of creating an innovative and valuable business model.

That is the overarching message I’d like to leave you with: clarity of vision and purpose is the glue that binds a team together and acts as a lubricant to mitigate the friction caused by obstacles along the way.

For more information on InMobi’s East-to-West strategy, see Naveen Tewari’s first post, here.

naveenNaveen Tewari is InMobi’s CEO and founder. He graduated from Harvard Business School and worked at Charles River Ventures and McKinsey & Company before starting InMobi. InMobi, based in Bangalore with offices in Singapore and San Francisco, currently employs more than 900 people and has taken $216 million to date in venture funding.

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc


Filed under: Business, Entrepreneur, Mobile, VentureBeat
    


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